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Canada offers ‘path to protection’ for Afghan interpreters amid ‘critical’ situation

Click to play video: 'Canada offers ‘path to protection’ for Afghan interpreters amid ‘critical’ situation' Canada offers ‘path to protection’ for Afghan interpreters amid ‘critical’ situation
Canadian Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino announced Friday that the government was launching a program that would offer a path to protection for Afghan interpreters and advisers who helped the military during their mission in Afghanistan – Jul 23, 2021

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Taliban is advancing rapidly across Afghanistan as U.S. forces withdraw.
  • Afghans who aided Canadian troops during the war there are now facing torture and death from the Taliban, prompting urgent calls for the government to help them.
  • The program announced Friday will see them and their families welcomed to Canada as refugees, though details on specifics of the plan are scarce.

Canadian officials are on the ground in Afghanistan and working to identify those eligible for a new “path to protection” for Afghans who supported Canadian troops during the war in that country.

The update from the government comes amid what Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino called a “critical” time for those who have helped Canadian soldiers and now face the risk of death and torture by a rapid Taliban advance across the country.

Details on the program are scarce so far but Mendicino said the program will welcome the Afghans and their families as refugees for resettlement. He said while the numbers are in flux, the estimate is that Afghans eligible under the program will be in the “thousands.”

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READ MORE: Canada has ‘moral obligation’ to protect Afghan interpreters from Taliban resurgence, say experts

Mendicino said the plan will focus on special immigration measures for Afghan interpreters, Afghans who have worked or are currently working to support the Canadian embassy, as well as their families.

It is also being kept deliberately broad in scope, and will also apply to those who worked in roles such as security guards, cooks, cleaners, drivers, and other roles in support of the embassy.

“We know that time is of the essence,” said Mendicino.

“We expect the first arrivals will be in Canada very shortly.”

Work continues to try to identify the Afghans who will be eligible, he said, but did not provide details when asked on how many individuals will be able to come to Canada or what the timeline is for the effort.

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan said they could not provide further details because of “operational security,” and said planning with coalition allies on logistics is underway.

“The plan itself has to be guarded for the safety of the people we’re trying to bring to Canada,” he said.

Click to play video: 'Mendicino talks logistics of resettlement plan for Afghan interpreters, advisors' Mendicino talks logistics of resettlement plan for Afghan interpreters, advisors
Mendicino talks logistics of resettlement plan for Afghan interpreters, advisors – Jul 23, 2021

Canada withdrew troops from Afghanistan in 2011 but after roughly 20 years, U.S. forces are now also in the process of withdrawing from the country after waging a war to remove the Taliban from power.

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The Taliban are Islamist extremists who enforce sharia law and held power in Afghanistan from roughly 1996 to 2001 when coalition forces overthrew them.

Now, the Taliban insurgency has been making rapid gains and now holds roughly half of the 421 districts as U.S. forces retreat, raising concerns that the militant extremists will be in a position to support other regional terrorist groups like ISIS and also target those who helped Canadian forces during the war.

Thousands of people have fled the Taliban advance.

As the fighters retake broad swaths of territory, former military leaders and veterans of Canada’s fight in Afghanistan have been urging the government to act quickly to honour the “moral obligation” this country owes to the Afghans who supported the coalition mission.

Mendicino echoed those sentiments on Friday.

“Not only does Canada owe them a debt of gratitude, we have a moral obligation to do right by them,” he said, and described the risk they will face retaliation from the Taliban as “grave.”

Click to play video: 'Afghan interpreters face death threats from Taliban after U.S. troops leave' Afghan interpreters face death threats from Taliban after U.S. troops leave
Afghan interpreters face death threats from Taliban after U.S. troops leave – Jun 3, 2021

In recent days, a group of Canadian veterans have been working to virtually try to coordinate a way for some of the Afghans who worked with soldiers to get to a safer place, pending evacuation, by using their existing network of contacts in the country.

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“We managed to get a guy who was surrounded by gunfire, active airstrikes coming in to try and clear the Taliban from the area. He was trapped. And we got him to safety,” said Robin Rickards, a Canadian veteran of the war.

“Well, to relative safety.”

Global News was able to speak with that man — a former Afghan interpreter who was stuck in Lashkar Gah, the capital of Helmand province currently under siege by the Taliban. Out of concern for his safety, Global News is not identifying the man or where he is currently located.

“They already have information about the people who work with the coalition forces,” said the interpreter of the Taliban fighters entering the city.

He described witnessing fighting just 500 metres from his home, and said Taliban fighters are dumping bodies of those who helped coalition forces on highways and roads to send a signal as they continue to retake territory across the country.

“They wanted to show the people … we’re going to kill all of them,” he said.

“We want the government to start evacuation as soon as possible.”

Click to play video: 'Canadian veterans mobilize to help, as Taliban targets Afghan translators' Canadian veterans mobilize to help, as Taliban targets Afghan translators
Canadian veterans mobilize to help, as Taliban targets Afghan translators – Jul 21, 2021

The U.S. State Department said on Monday it plans to evacuate around 2,500 Afghans who assisted American troops during the conflict, and fly them to a military base in Virginia within days.

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The U.S. also has what’s known as the Special Immigrant Visa program which allows those who worked with U.S. troops in Afghanistan or Iraq to apply to immigrate. NBC News has cited U.S. officials as saying thousands of Afghans in the process of applying to that program will be flown to either military bases or a third country in order to be able to complete their application in safety.

It’s not yet clear to what extent Canada could coordinate with the U.S. on the evacuations or on moving the Afghans to a safer third country or area while their paperwork is processed.

Sajjan said while Canada is in discussions, he could not provide specific details.

Both the Conservatives and NDP, though, said the government could and should have acted sooner.

Tory Leader Erin O’Toole said the advance of the Taliban was predictable and that there should have been action before now to get the Afghans and their families to safety.

“The Liberal government should have made this announcement weeks ago. The Americans made it clear that they would be leaving Afghanistan months ago, and the rise of the Taliban was an expected result,” he said in a statement.

“Instead of putting forward a plan to help the heroic Afghan interpreters, support staff, and their families, the Trudeau Liberals sat on their hands and did nothing. It’s quite disappointing that these Afghans who saved the lives of our men and women in uniform were an afterthought to this Liberal government.”

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NDP defence critic Randall Garrison accused the government of treating the Afghans as an “afterthought” and criticized the lack of details about the plan from the government.

“The US government has committed to providing airlift services for Afghans while their applications are processing, but details of the program are lacking from the Canadian government, including how quickly they will be able to bring them to safety,” he said.

“These collaborators, who played a vital role, have been abandoned for a decade without the support they desperately needed to find safety in Canada and deserve better. Countless interpreters and vital staff along with their families have been living in danger while the Liberals dragged their feet.”

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