Advertisement

Advocacy group says more work needed to reduce motorcycle deaths in Nova Scotia

An alternative way to charge a fair rate for motorcycle owners by SGI is getting mixed reviews from those who ride.
Jimi Swinimer, president of the Bikers Down Society, says the government should have more signage reminding people to watch out for motorcycles and increase training for newly licensed car drivers. Adrian Raaber / Global News

HALIFAX – A Nova Scotia group that assists victims of motorcycle crashes and their families says more has to be done to reduce the number of riders killed on the province’s roads.

Jimi Swinimer, president of the Bikers Down Society, says more public education is needed during times when bikers are actually on the road.

Swinimer says a weekday in May is the wrong time of year to be proclaiming Motorcycle Awareness Week because weather dictates bikers usually don’t start driving until June.

Sixty-three-year-old Ronald Edward McNeil of Lower Sackville was the latest person to die in a motorcycle crash in the province.

He lost control of his bike Sunday on Highway 102 near Elmsdale and crashed before being struck by a truck travelling in the same lane.

The Transportation Department says McNeil was the eighth person killed in Nova Scotia this year while riding a motorcycle.

Story continues below advertisement

Swinimer says the government should have more signage reminding people to watch out for motorcycles and increase training for newly licensed car drivers.

He says there needs to be a memorable campaign like the province’s winter driving safety advertisement, in which a snowplow driver tells motorists that he isn’t driving a “feather duster.”