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Repaid CERB wrongly listed as taxable income on some tax slips: CRA

Click to play video: 'Things to consider when filing your 2020 taxes' Things to consider when filing your 2020 taxes
The tax filing deadline for 2020 is April 30. This year, many Canadians will probably have a more complicated return, especially those who collected CERB or have worked from home. Trant Hamans from ATB Financial joined the Global News Morning Edmonton with some tips to keep in mind before filing – Feb 22, 2021

When the COVID-19 pandemic closed schools last spring, crosswalk guard and recent graduate Danny Thomson was encouraged by the Ottawa Safety Council to apply for the new COVID-19 emergency benefits.

But even though Thomson returned $3,000 in Canada Emergency Response Benefits last year after they realized they were ineligible, their tax slip from the Canada Revenue Agency says $2,000 has not been repaid. The amount is considered taxable income for 2020.

The Canada Revenue Agency confirmed this week that some taxpayers who repaid COVID-19 related benefits in 2020 have received incorrect tax slips that wrongly list portions of the repaid benefits as taxable income.

The CRA had previously informed CERB recipients that they must repay the benefit if they earned more income than expected during the four-week payment period, or if they applied and later realized they were ineligible. It also said duplicate CERB payments should be repaid _ if recipients applied for and got the CERB from both the CRA and Employment Insurance or Service Canada for the same eligibility period.

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Click to play video: 'Coronavirus: CERB recipients deemed ineligible after messaging mix-up won’t be forced to repay' Coronavirus: CERB recipients deemed ineligible after messaging mix-up won’t be forced to repay
Coronavirus: CERB recipients deemed ineligible after messaging mix-up won’t be forced to repay – Feb 9, 2021

CERB recipients who repaid before Dec. 31, 2020, should not have to pay tax on those amounts on 2020 tax returns, the revenue agency’s website notes, with the repaid amounts subtracted from the individual’s benefit amount on T4A slips.

But the tax agency said there is a rare error in which the repayments are credited to a taxpayer’s T1 instalment account instead of their emergency benefits account.

“These repayments can be properly and easily credited to the correct account,” CRA spokesperson Etienne Biram said in a statement.

Read more: CERB recipients deemed ineligible after messaging mix-up won’t be forced to repay

Rajaratnam said he has seen the tax slip issues cropping up across his network, from friends to LinkedIn connections. The first question, he said, is whether the repayment of the emergency benefit was made before Dec. 31. If a taxpayer repaid the benefits in January or February, they’ll have to wait until this time next year to get the adjustment in their 2021 tax filing.

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Before filing a complaint, Rajaratnam said it’s also worth checking with your bank to ensure the repayment left your account and the relevant agency received it.

He suggested anyone who repaid benefits before the new year check for errors as soon as the T-slip arrives, rather than leaving it until closer to the tax-filing deadline to catch a miscalculation. That way, Rajaratnam said, there will be time to get a corrected tax slip.

“I wouldn’t suggest anybody to file your tax return without having that (amended T4 slip),” Rajaratnam said.

Read more: Where did CERB go? Data shows disparities between Canada’s urban and rural areas

 

Rajaratnam said that he’s hopeful the CRA will provide detailed guidance on this issue before the end of April, so people know when to expect their corrected tax slips.

If for some reason, someone notices the error right before the tax-filing deadline and cannot get through to the CRA, Rajaratnam said there is a last resort: Putting the correct amount on the tax filing and including a letter to the CRA explaining why the T4A doesn’t match the tax filing.

But Rajaratnam stressed that it is best not to wait, since the CRA has not yet said if it will offer extensions to deal with these issues.

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“This has been a very fluid situation with all their the wage subsidies and CERB benefits,” Rajaratnam said. “I think the CRA is, similar to all other governments, trying to do the best they can.”

The CRA could also be clearer in its instructions and on its website, Thomson says, noting that Reddit message boards on CERB and Employment Insurance are filled with similar anecdotes.

“I know I’m not the only one who’s had this issue, and it’s scary getting a big government letter in the mail,” Thomson said.

“I don’t think I should have to pay taxes on this. Hopefully I can get through to someone to get this fixed.”

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