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‘I’m extremely disappointed’: B.C. government fires back at Skip The Dishes’ new fee

Click to play video: 'B.C. restaurants upset after Skip The Dishes introduces new delivery fee' B.C. restaurants upset after Skip The Dishes introduces new delivery fee
The president of B.C.'s Restaurant and Foodservices Association is speaking out after a popular food delivery app imposed a 99-cent surcharge. Ted Chernecki explains why restaurants say this will continue to hurt their bottom lines. – Feb 4, 2021

The B.C. government is speaking out against Skip The Dishes after the food courier company added a temporary $0.99 “B.C. Fee” to all orders within the province.

“I’m extremely disappointed in this decision by Skip The Dishes,” said Jobs Minister Ravi Kahlon on Thursday. “It was our objective to ensure that restaurants weren’t getting exploited during the pandemic.  That’s why we put the order in place.”

Read more: Skip The Dishes adds $0.99 ‘B.C. Fee’ after province caps what it can charge restaurants

In late December, the province enacted a temporary 15-per-cent cap on the amount of fees that delivery services can charge restaurants in a bid to help the industry amid COVID-19.

This week, the company added a temporary $0.99 fee as a direct response “to ensure that there is no impact to the service and support we’re able to provide all our stakeholders.”

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Kahlon said the Solicitor General’s office would seek legal advice on further action.

Click to play video: 'Skip the Dishes imposes ‘B.C. Fee’ on take-out food orders' Skip the Dishes imposes ‘B.C. Fee’ on take-out food orders
Skip the Dishes imposes ‘B.C. Fee’ on take-out food orders – Feb 4, 2021

The delivery-fee cap was an election promise for both the BC NDP and BC Liberals during October’s election campaign.

Skip The Dishes has said it’s supported restaurants with $43 million in commission rebates and “order-driving initiatives” during the pandemic, while restaurant owners have protested delivery fees of up to 30 per cent.

– with files from Simon Little

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