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Studio restrictions prompt outdoor dance performances by Saskatoon troupe

Click to play video 'Studio restrictions prompt outdoor dance performances by Saskatoon troupe' Studio restrictions prompt outdoor dance performances by Saskatoon troupe
WATCH: A Saskatoon dance troupe has been providing both entertainment and exercise for nearly a year, no matter the weather conditions – Jan 16, 2021

When COVID-19 restrictions were put in place in March 2020, the KSAMB Dance Company wanted to find a way to continually host performances.

They’ve been able to do so with Wild Card Movement, a dance performance that’s held every Friday night at City Hall Square, beginning promptly when the clock bell tolls for 7 p.m.

“Because it was okay to be outside in groups, limited sized groups with physical distancing, we decided that we would take all of our dance activities outdoors,” KSAMB co-director Miki Mappin explained.

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Their routines may seem random in nature to a first-time audience member, although the troupe says that the choreography is better described as taking calculated risks.

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“We don’t really know what’s going on, and we have to rely on each other through various means of communication that we’ve built up over time,” Mappin said. “(Allowing us) to be able to follow the cues of each other.”

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“It’s this balance between impulse… It’s like math and poetry together,” KSAMB co-director Kyle Syverson added. “It’s impulse and composition.”

The chemistry shared amongst the performers has helped to strengthen strong bonds throughout the troupe, something that they’ve relied upon even more during the pandemic.

“I think our group is actually more cohesive, and bigger than it’s ever been,” Syverson said. “It’s been awesome.”

A sentiment shared by Mappin.

“Part of what we’re hoping to do is to inspire people to move their bodies, to express themselves in a safe and positive way,” Mappin said.

The connection through performance has been beneficial, not only for those dancing, but those who come to take in the performance.

“When friends do come out, or people that happen to be passing by, it’s very rewarding,” Syverson said. “(It’s) lovely to be able to make connections like that.”

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