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Coronavirus: Saskatoon police chief tests positive for COVID-19

“I am fortunate to have mild symptoms but of course that is not the case for everyone who is exposed to COVID-19,” Cooper said in a statement. File / Global News

The Saskatoon Police Service (SPS) says its chief has tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

Police Chief Troy Cooper learned of the diagnosis on Thursday, according to a press release.

Read more: Saskatchewan epidemiologist calls for second COVID-19 shutdown

SPS said he is currently isolating at his home, is feeling well and continuing to fulfil his duties.

“I am fortunate to have mild symptoms but of course that is not the case for everyone who is exposed to COVID-19,” Cooper said in a statement.

“To keep our community safe we all must follow the measures and restrictions of the public health order, use the COVID Alert app and follow proper hygiene measures.”

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A COVID-19 outbreak was declared by the Saskatchewan Health Authority in the SPS’s platoon patrol level A section on Dec. 21, 2020.

In regards to Cooper’s test result, SPS said on Thursday that it’s believed the virus resulted from community transmission.

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Questions about COVID-19? Here are some things you need to know:

Symptoms can include fever, cough and difficulty breathing — very similar to a cold or flu. Some people can develop a more severe illness. People most at risk of this include older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease. If you develop symptoms, contact public health authorities.

To prevent the virus from spreading, experts recommend frequent handwashing and coughing into your sleeve. They also recommend minimizing contact with others, staying home as much as possible and maintaining a distance of two metres from other people if you go out. In situations where you can’t keep a safe distance from others, public health officials recommend the use of a non-medical face mask or covering to prevent spreading the respiratory droplets that can carry the virus. In some provinces and municipalities across the country, masks or face coverings are now mandatory in indoor public spaces.

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For full COVID-19 coverage from Global News, click here.