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Urban Roots London nears goal to purchase land for a forever home with $25,000 interest-free loan

Urban Roots London land at 21 Norlan Ave. in London Ont. via Chuffed.org fundraising page

A $25,000 interest-free loan has put Urban Roots London one step closer to the goal of buying the farmland it currently rents.

Late last year the non-profit started the campaign to buy the land at 21 Norland Ave. to create long-term infrastructure and expand its fields and growing season.

The majority of the project is being financed, however, the group still needs to raise $50,000 towards the 10 per cent downpayment.

The $25,000 interest-free loan comes from Dianne and Marcus Plowright.

“We believe that investing in the local environment creates lasting benefits for people in our community,” said Dianne Plowright.

“Marcus and I are thrilled to support Urban Roots London in their mission to revitalize underused green space for urban agriculture.”

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The interest-free loan and online campaign have raised over $41,000 towards the group’s goal.

“We are humbled by the level of support Urban Roots London has received so far,” said Jeremy Horrell, president of Urban Roots London’s board of directors.

Urban Roots London is a non-profit organization that takes underused land and revitalizes it to make it fit for agriculture.

Part of the group’s mission is to help address climate change on a local level by helping Londoners across local produce through its sale and donations to front-line charities.

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Urban Roots produce is split equally three ways between My Sister’s Place and Hamilton Road Crouch Resource Centre, affordable neighbourhood sale, and wholesale to restaurants and farmers markets.

Since first starting in 2017, the non-profit has been able to donate over 10,217 pounds of food.

“We are proud to be part of a city where so many people are ready to rethink food systems and the use of urban spaces,” Horrell said.

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