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Prolific Calgary car prowler who targeted city parks facing 183 charges: police

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Prolific car prowler arrested by Calgary police
WATCH: Police in Calgary have arrested a 59-year-old man in connection with more than 180 car prowlings. As Tracy Nagai reports, police are reminding residents about the importance of reporting crimes no matter how insignificant they may seem – Oct 1, 2020

A man in his 50s is facing a whopping 183 criminal charges in connection to a series of car prowlings in Calgary dating back to May.

Calgary police say 59-year-old David Arthur Daniels is charged with offences including theft, property damage and fraud.

Police said the prowlings happened in popular parks throughout the city, including North and South Glenmore Park, Fish Creek Provincial Park, Heritage Park and outside of the city in Bragg Creek.

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It’s alleged cash and credit cards were taken from wallets and purses left unattended in the vehicles, and then used at nearby stores before they could be reported as stolen.

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“For one person to face 183 Criminal Code charges of this type is quite unusual,” Staff Sgt. Mark England said in a news release Thursday. “These offences occurred during the day at popular parking lots for our city’s pathway systems.”

England explained it’s an example of why Calgarians shouldn’t leave valuables in their vehicles even when parked in busy parking lots.

“We can’t be complacent – even with many passersby, these kinds of crimes still occur,” he said.

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Though dozens of people were victimized by the prowlings, police said only a handful reported the incidents.

“Reporting is important because it helps us identify patterns of behaviour,” England added. “This operation, in particular, highlights how prolific and impactful one person can be.”

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