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Summer conditions leaving Saskatchewan farmers optimistic heading into harvest

Click to play video 'Summer conditions leaving Saskatchewan farmers optimistic heading into harvest' Summer conditions leaving Saskatchewan farmers optimistic heading into harvest
WATCH: Weather has been favourable in Saskatchewan this summer, leaving most crops growing on schedule.

Many regions in Saskatchewan have seen plenty of rain and sunshine this summer, creating ideal conditions for many farmers.

“We have an average to above-average crop coming along in a lot of the province and producers are looking forward to having a more regular harvest season this year,” Agricultural Producers Association Of Saskatchewan (APAS) president Todd Lewis said.

Read more: Saskatchewan crops advancing quickly, harvest to begin in the coming weeks

Different crops need different conditions to grow. Lewis said excess moisture has been good for some, but not all.

“The North Battleford area, the Tisdale area and Saskatoon area have had excessive moisture. There has been some crop loss due to flooding,” Lewis said.

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Moisture can also cause diseases.

“There are fields in the traditional pea and lentil growing areas in particular that in some cases have some fairly severe impacts from pulse crop root rots,” Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture crops extensions specialist John Ippolito said.

Some pulse crops, like peas and lentils, will be harvested near the end of August. They are typically grown in central and western Saskatchewan and Ippolito said the warm, sunny conditions expected in coming weeks will help with harvest.

Pulses being harvested in the fall, like soy beans, typically grow in eastern regions in the province and would benefit from more rainfall in August.

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While the livestock industry has been hit harder by the COVID-19 pandemic, Lewis said it hasn’t impacted crop production or distribution.

Even though good conditions are expected in August, weather can’t always be predicted. Farmers are trying to be prepared for whatever may come their way for the rest of the year.

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