Advertisement

Manitoba sees 6 new coronavirus cases Monday, possible exposure reported in Gull Lake, Man.

Coronavirus: Manitoba sees 6 new coronavirus cases Monday, possible exposure reported in Gull Lake
Health officials say six new cases of novel coronavirus have been identified in Manitoba. The new cases reported Monday, as well as 10 reported over the weekend, bring the total number of lab-confirmed positive and probable positive cases in Manitoba to 400.

Editor’s Note: The story below has been updated to reflect the dates of when shoppers may have been exposed to COVID-19. A previous version stated incorrect dates, which have been revised by public health officials.

Health officials say six new cases of novel coronavirus have been identified in Manitoba.

The new cases reported Monday, as well as 10 reported over the weekend, bring the total number of lab-confirmed positive and probable positive cases in Manitoba to 400.

Read more: 6 new cases of COVID-19 in Manitoba on Sunday

Of the 16 new cases reported over the weekend and Monday, health officials say four cases are in southern Manitoba, four are in the east Interlake, four are in Winnipeg, and four are from the Prairie Mountain Health region.

Story continues below advertisement

As of Monday there are 74 known active cases and 319 people are reported to have recovered from the virus. Health officials say three people are hospitalized with COVID-19, including two in intensive care.

Potential exposure warning

Health officials also warned about a possible exposure to COVID-19 at a grocery store in Gull Lake, Man.

They say a person who has since tested positive for the virus went to the Sherwood Grocery Store in the community, roughly 73 km northeast of Winnipeg, on July 20, 21 while symptomatic.

Public health officials had originally said Monday the person had also been at the store July 19, as well, but revised the dates Tuesday.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

“Individuals may be contagious up to two days before symptoms appear,” a government spokesperson said Tuesday.

“Symptoms appeared in the positive COVID-19 case on July 21 and risk to the public is low.”

Read more: 4 new COVID-19 cases as Phase 4 of Manitoba’s reopening plan launched

Close contacts to the case will be notified, the province says, but anyone who was in the store during those days should self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms and get tested should they develop.

Story continues below advertisement

The cases come as the province further loosened restrictions imposed to stem the virus’s spread Saturday.

Read more: Manitoba to go ahead with ‘adjusted’ Phase 4 opening amid COVID-19 Saturday

Under the new rules casinos, cinemas and theatres can open, but at 30 per cent capacity.

Previously considered plans to lift the 14-day self-isolation requirement for travellers arriving from Eastern Canada and increase limits on public gatherings — to 75 people from 50 indoors and to 250 from 100 outdoors — were taken off the table for now after concerns were raised by Manitobans.

Story continues below advertisement
Coronavirus: Manitoba releases Phase 4 Reopening Manitoba Program starting July 25
Coronavirus: Manitoba releases Phase 4 Reopening Manitoba Program starting July 25

Questions about COVID-19? Here are some things you need to know:

Symptoms can include fever, cough and difficulty breathing — very similar to a cold or flu. Some people can develop a more severe illness. People most at risk of this include older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease. If you develop symptoms, contact public health authorities.

To prevent the virus from spreading, experts recommend frequent handwashing and coughing into your sleeve. They also recommend minimizing contact with others, staying home as much as possible and maintaining a distance of two metres from other people if you go out. In situations where you can’t keep a safe distance from others, public health officials recommend the use of a non-medical face mask or covering to prevent spreading the respiratory droplets that can carry the virus. In some provinces and municipalities across the country, masks or face coverings are now mandatory in indoor public spaces.

Story continues below advertisement

For full COVID-19 coverage from Global News, click here.