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Shell’s Quest carbon capture project hits milestone of 5M tonnes

Quest carbon capture and storage facility in Fort Saskatchewan Alta, on Friday November 6, 2015. Shell Canada says the Quest carbon capture and storage project at the Scotford Upgrader north of Edmonton has reached the milestone of four million tonnes of stored carbon dioxide, equivalent to the annual emissions of about one million cars.
Quest carbon capture and storage facility in Fort Saskatchewan Alta, on Friday November 6, 2015. Shell Canada says the Quest carbon capture and storage project at the Scotford Upgrader north of Edmonton has reached the milestone of four million tonnes of stored carbon dioxide, equivalent to the annual emissions of about one million cars. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Shell Canada says the Quest carbon capture and storage project north of Edmonton has reached the milestone of five million tonnes of stored carbon dioxide, equivalent to the annual emissions of about 1.25 million cars.

It says the accomplishment was achieved ahead of schedule and has been attained at a lower cost than expected.

Read more: Shell Quest carbon capture and storage project reaches milestone of 4M tonnes

Quest opened in 2015 and cost about $1.35 billion, backed with $745 million from the Alberta government and $120 million from Ottawa.

Majority ownership of the project was sold to Calgary-based Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. in 2017, along with most of Shell’s Alberta oilsands assets, but Shell retained a 10 per cent interest and is still the operator.

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It says the cost to operate Quest is about 35 per cent lower than what was forecast in 2015 and, if Quest were to be built today, it would cost about 30 per cent less.

Read more: Shell wants carbon capture tech to come to forefront of climate change talks

Quest captures about one third of the CO2 emissions from the Shell-operated Scotford oilsands upgrader and transports it via a 65-kilometre pipeline to be stored more than two kilometres underground in a sandstone rock reservoir.

“Widespread adoption of carbon capture and storage is one of the key solutions the world needs right now to help solve the climate challenge,” said Shell Canada president Michael Crothers.