Advertisement

Saskatchewan remembers those lost to workplace fatalities on National Day of Mourning

Flags were lowered to half-mast at Saskatchewan government buildings on April 28 to mark the National Day of Mourning for those killed, injured or sickened on the job.
Flags were lowered to half-mast at Saskatchewan government buildings on April 28 to mark the National Day of Mourning for those killed, injured or sickened on the job. File / Global News

There were 36 workplace fatalities in Saskatchewan in 2019, and on Tuesday, the provincial government is taking part in the National Day of Mourning.

Government buildings across the province will join the country by lowering their flags to half-mast from sunrise to sunset.

“The best way for us to honour those that have lost their life while on the job is to do our part in building safer, healthier workplaces,” Labour Relations and Workplace Safety Minister Don Morgan said.

READ MORE: Dozens gather at Regina City Hall for National Day of Mourning

“Every worker has the right to return home safely at the end of the workday.”

The day pays tribute to not only those killed on the job but those injured or stricken with illness while at work.

Story continues below advertisement

“Workplace fatalities and serious injuries have an impact on the lives of families, friends and colleagues, and our hearts go out to all those left behind by these tragedies,” Saskatchewan Workers’ Compensation Board chairperson Gord Dobrowolsky said.

READ MORE: ‘He died trying to provide for us’ — Day of Mourning a sombre reminder of workplace safety

“Today, we take time to mourn and remember those that have lost their lives, and we renew our commitment to working together to keep everyone safe on the job.”

The Canadian Labour Congress first declared April 28 as the National Day of Mourning in 1984.