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‘Voluntary evacuation’ in effect for some residents of Fort Vermilion, Alberta due to flood risk: officials

Map provided by Mackenzie County showing a voluntary evacuation area.
Map provided by Mackenzie County showing a voluntary evacuation area. CREDIT: Facebook/Mackenzie County

Because of the risk of flooding, officials with Mackenzie County in northern Alberta said Friday night that a “voluntary evacuation is in effect for residents located in the hamlet of Fort Vermilion that reside east of 50 Street, north of the golf course, River Road, and Boreal Housing.”

“This voluntary evacuation is only for the residents located in the voluntary evacuation area,” officials said in an information alert. “The Peace River ice break-up may cause flooding in low lying areas.

“If you choose to evacuate, bring your medication, blankets, sleeping bags, personal items and supplies for kids and pets.”

Anyone who voluntarily leaves their home as part of an evacuation is being advised that they must call 780-927-3718.

Earlier in the day, a post on the Mackenzie County Facebook page said the Peace River ice jam watch was upgraded to a warning.

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“According to our most recent updates, the ice is jammed approximately 100 kilometres from Fort Vermilion, and the ice jam is 86 kilometres long,” the post said.

“North Vermilion (Buttertown) residents living along the Peace River were evacuated yesterday as a precautionary measure.”

READ MORE: Flood risk prompts warning of possible evacuation for some northern Alberta communities

Officials said that as the ice cover on the Peace River breaks up, ice runs and ice jams are causing floods along the lower reaches of the Peace River.

“Sunny Valley, Kulyna Flats, Carcajou, and Tompkins Landing have been impacted by floodwaters,” county officials said, adding that Alberta Environment and Parks is also monitoring the situation.

For more information, click here.

Watch below: Some Global News videos about flooding and flood preparedness in Western Canada in the spring of 2020.

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