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London-St. Thomas jobless rate rises to 6.3% in August

Canada lost 24,200 jobs last month and its unemployment rate moved up to 5.7 per cent to give the economy its weakest three-month stretch of job creation since early 2018. A steel worker builds a structure in Ottawa on Monday, March 5, 2018. Even with the July decline, compared to a year earlier, the numbers show Canada added a healthy dose of 353,000 new positions almost all of which were full time. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick.
Canada lost 24,200 jobs last month and its unemployment rate moved up to 5.7 per cent to give the economy its weakest three-month stretch of job creation since early 2018. A steel worker builds a structure in Ottawa on Monday, March 5, 2018. Even with the July decline, compared to a year earlier, the numbers show Canada added a healthy dose of 353,000 new positions almost all of which were full time. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick. Sean Kilpatrick/CP

The summer hasn’t been kind to London’s unemployment rate.

The jobless rate jumped for the second straight month, rising to 6.3 per cent in August, after climbing to 5.8 per cent in July.

It stood at 4.9 per cent back in June.

The employment rate rose due to a large increase in the labour force in London and St. Thomas. While London did add 4,100 jobs last month, that was surpassed by the 5,700 people who entered the work force.

READ MORE: Canada sees jobs surge in August with 81K new positions

The job gain in August makes up for the 2,400 jobs lost in July but is still below jobs numbers from April.

London’s participation rate rose a full point, climbing from 57.2 per cent last month to 58.3 per cent in August. It has hovered around 57 per cent for most of the summer and continues to be the lowest in the country.

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Nationally the unemployment rate held steady while the economy added 81,100 jobs.

READ MORE: London task force declares jobs crisis in the city

Stats Canada reports the unemployment rate held steady at 5.7 per cent.

Most of the job gains were in Ontario and Quebec. Employment rose by 58,000 in August in Ontario, all in part-time work.

Gains were led by wholesale and retail trade.