June 24, 2019 5:52 pm

Wait, There’s More podcast: Could Iran and the U.S. go to war?

An Iranian flag seen amass against the cloudy blue sky on April 22, 2013 in Tehran, Iran.

(Photo by Kaveh Kazemi/Getty Images)
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Tensions between the U.S. and Iran have been escalating since earlier this month when the U.S. blamed Iran for two explosions on oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz.

Last week, U.S. President Donald Trump came within moments of ordering a military strike on Iran before calling it off.

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The U.S. has since said it has struck Iran’s military computers with a cyberattack, and on Monday, Trump announced economic sanctions against Iran.

READ MORE: After Trump calls off military strike against Iran, the U.S. struck Iranian military computers

Iran, meanwhile, says it will not be bullied by the U.S.

The conflict between the U.S. and Iran stretches back decades, but the more recent troubles date from just before 2015.

On Monday’s edition of Wait, There’s More, host Tamara Kandahkar speaks with Golnar Motevalli, Tehran-based reporter with Bloomberg News, about the situation.

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