May 2, 2019 9:21 am
Updated: May 2, 2019 9:22 am

Elderly couple mistakenly sign for parcel containing 20 kilos of meth

According to Victoria Police, the package was delivered to a home in the Werribee area at about 1 p.m. Police allege the parcel, sent through a courier service, was filled with the drug methylamphetamine.

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An elderly Australian couple signed for a package that was mistakenly delivered to their Melbourne home on Wednesday. It contained 20 kilograms of methamphetamines, police said.

According to Victoria Police, the package was delivered to a home in the Werribee area at about 1 p.m. Police allege the parcel, sent through a courier service, was filled with the drug methylamphetamine.

The couple called authorities right after making the discovery.

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“The occupants of the premises are obviously quite elderly, so they’re unsure of the significance of the find,” Detective Acting Senior Sergeant Matthew Kershaw told reporters Wednesday. “Obviously in terms of what we have recovered, we know it’s quite significant. But we’re just assuring them that they’ve done absolutely nothing wrong.”

Police estimated the package contained about $10 million in drugs.

“Ten million dollars’ worth of drugs sent to [the] wrong address to an elderly couple — that’s quite incredible to comprehend that someone could be that sloppy,” Kershaw said.

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Police said in a statement that detectives later executed a search warrant in Bundoora, a Melbourne suburb, where authorities allegedly found another 20 kilos of meth.

Police said a 21-year-old man was arrested at the scene.

“It’s quite a large find … that’s 800,000 hits off the street that we’ve intercepted,” Kershaw told reporters.

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