April 23, 2019 6:22 am
Updated: April 23, 2019 10:18 am

Ceremonies, vigils planned to honour victims of deadly Toronto van attack

Tributes are seen on a memorial at Yonge St. and Finch Ave. in Toronto on Thursday, April 26, 2018 for the victims of the deadly van attack.

Cole Burston / The Canadian Press
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Toronto’s mayor says a deadly van attack that left the city grappling with grief a year ago also set off a wave of solidarity and support among its residents.

Hours before a ceremony to honour those hurt or killed in the April 23, 2018, attack, John Tory said he hopes the city will show the same strength and heart in the future, and not just in the face of tragedy.

“This unfathomable loss of life left our city in mourning . . . this was a tragedy the likes of which we’d never seen before,” Tory said Tuesday morning.

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READ MORE: ‘United against evil’: Toronto holds numerous events to mark 1-year anniversary of van attack

“We saw people from all walks of life running to the rescue of those in need and offering to help in the aftermath. We saw people of all faiths gather to mourn and to provide comfort to those who needed it so very badly and many of whom continue to need and continue to receive support. . . . We saw our city united against evil and dedicated to healing and to love.”

Many of those who helped that day – first responders and Good Samaritans alike – are still affected by what they saw, Tory said.

Ten people were killed and 16 were injured when a white rental van plowed into pedestrians along busy Yonge Street in the city’s north.

Alek Minassian, 26, is charged with 10 counts of first-degree murder and 16 counts of attempted murder. He is set to face trial next February.

Several events were planned Tuesday to remember the incident and pay tribute to the victims and their families.

READ MORE: Looking back at the Toronto van attack: How 7 minutes changed the city

The City of Toronto is holding an event at the Mel Lastman Square Amphitheatre at 1:30 p.m. to coincide with the time of the incident.

The city is also expected to install temporary signs in the area to commemorate what it has dubbed the “Yonge Street Tragedy” until permanent memorials are created. The city says consultations on the memorials will begin this spring.

Events are also planned elsewhere in the neighbourhood where the attack took place.

The Willowdale community is hosting a moment of silence, an evening vigil and a free dinner, among other events.

It is also bringing in trauma counsellors and therapy dogs for those who need support. of solidarity and support among its residents.

Hours before a ceremony to honour those hurt or killed in the April 23, 2018, attack, John Tory said he hopes the city will show the same strength and heart in the future, and not just in the face of tragedy.

READ MORE: One year after Toronto van attack, experts say outrage over incel movement ‘forgotten’

“This unfathomable loss of life left our city in mourning . . . this was a tragedy the likes of which we’d never seen before,” Tory said Tuesday morning.

“We saw people from all walks of life running to the rescue of those in need and offering to help in the aftermath. We saw people of all faiths gather to mourn and to provide comfort to those who needed it so very badly and many of whom continue to need and continue to receive support. . . . We saw our city united against evil and dedicated to healing and to love.”

Many of those who helped that day – first responders and Good Samaritans alike – are still affected by what they saw, Tory said.

Ten people were killed and 16 were injured when a white rental van plowed into pedestrians along busy Yonge Street in the city’s north.

Alek Minassian, 26, is charged with 10 counts of first-degree murder and 16 counts of attempted murder. He is set to face trial next February.

READ MORE: 25% of van attack victims turned down donated money, said it should go to those more in need

Several events were planned Tuesday to remember the incident and pay tribute to the victims and their families.

The City of Toronto is holding an event at the Mel Lastman Square Amphitheatre at 1:30 p.m. to coincide with the time of the incident.

The city is also expected to install temporary signs in the area to commemorate what it has dubbed the “Yonge Street Tragedy” until permanent memorials are created. The city says consultations on the memorials will begin this spring.

Events are also planned elsewhere in the neighbourhood where the attack took place.

The Willowdale community is hosting a moment of silence, an evening vigil and a free dinner, among other events.

It is also bringing in trauma counsellors and therapy dogs for those who need support.

© 2019 The Canadian Press

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