January 9, 2019 10:48 am
Updated: January 14, 2019 9:42 am

Saskatoon Transit ridership rises by 8.4% in 2018

WATCH ABOVE: Ridership is on the rise at Saskatoon Transit and operations manager Mike Moellenbeck believes changes to improve service and the customer experience are factors.

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Saskatoon Transit is expecting to top more than a million rides per month in 2019.

Annual ridership increased by 8.4 per cent in 2018, and transit director Jim McDonald said a focus on customers is a key to continued growth.

READ MORE: Broadway businesses, residents ‘appalled’ by Saskatoon bus rapid transit plan


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“In order to keep increasing our ridership numbers, we must continue to focus on the customer first,” McDonald said in a statement.

“The key to our success is overall improved service, a better customer experience and technology that supports both.”

After a decline in 2016, transit had a ridership increase of roughly two per cent in 2017, and 8.4 per cent in the first 11 months of 2018.

READ MORE: Several changes to Saskatoon Transit routes to offer high-frequency service

McDonald said the increase is remarkable given ridership has fallen or only risen incrementally in many markets.

“Any increase in ridership is encouraging to see, but 8 per cent is incredible,” he said.

“It shows people are recognizing transit as a viable alternative.”

McDonald said work continues on implementing a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system.

“Changes already made will support a successful BRT system in Saskatoon,” he said.

“The new system, which features a plan for crisscrossing, high-frequency routes, will connect different parts of the city.”

WATCH BELOW: Coverage of the BRT debate in Saskatoon

More high-frequency routes were added by Saskatoon Transit in 2018, and officials will undertake a bus stop audit in 2019 to ensure bus stops are located appropriately around the city.

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