December 19, 2018 12:07 pm

Date set for inquest into fatal Radiohead stage collapse in Toronto

A collapsed stage is shown at a Radiohead concert at Downsview Park in Toronto on June 16, 2012. Lawyers for an entertainment company and an engineer accused in a deadly 2012 stage collapse at an outdoor Radiohead concert in Toronto are asking an Ontario court to stay the charges against them. The entertainment company Live Nation and an engineer, Domenic Cugliari, are arguing the case has seen unreasonable delays that violate their right to a timely trial.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
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TORONTO – A coroner’s inquest into the death of a technician killed during a stage collapse at a Radiohead concert in Toronto will get underway in the new year.

The Office of Ontario’s Chief Coroner says the proceedings are set to begin on March 25, 2019.

READ MORE: Radiohead expresses anger at first show in Toronto since 2012 fatal stage collapse


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Scott Johnson, 33, was killed on June 16, 2012, when part of a massive stage structure crashed down just hours before Radiohead was due to perform at Downsview Park in north Toronto. Three others were injured.

Charges were laid in the case but were eventually stayed after a judge found the matter had taken too long to come to trial.

The inquest will examine the circumstances around Johnson’s death and a jury may make recommendations aimed at preventing similar incidents.

READ MORE: Coroner’s inquest to be held into fatal Radiohead stage collapse in Toronto

Radiohead’s lead singer Thom Yorke has sharply criticized what he described as lack of accountability for the deadly collapse, and Johnson’s father has previously said he hopes the inquest will provide some answers.

Thirteen charges were laid in the case against the show’s promoter Live Nation, engineer Domenic Cugliari and contractor Optex Staging under provincial health and safety laws.

READ MORE: Accused in Radiohead stage collapse asking Ontario court to stay charges

The subsequent trial was derailed when the presiding judge declared he had lost jurisdiction over the case given his appointment to a higher court. That decision led to a senior justice declaring a mistrial and a new hearing was planned.

In September 2017, charges in the case were stayed after a judge ruled the matter took too long to get to trial.

© 2018 The Canadian Press

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