November 9, 2018 8:56 am
Updated: November 9, 2018 9:37 am

Tory reminds Toronto residents to take part in federal online consultation on handgun ban

Toronto Mayor John Tory speaks during a news conference at city hall.

Nick Westoll / Global News
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Mayor John Tory is encouraging Toronto residents to take part in the federal government’s online public consultation on a handgun ban before the internet survey expires on Saturday.

“We know the vast majority of Toronto residents support a handgun ban. It is more important than ever for their voices to be heard as the federal government considers taking this important step that will save lives,” Tory said in a media release.

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“We have seen an increase in gun violence across Canada, including right here in Toronto. We must do everything possible to limit access to guns – that includes cracking down on gun trafficking across the border from the U.S. and banning handguns here at home.”

READ MORE: Should Canada ban handguns? Debate stirs after Danforth mass shooting

Earlier this year, Toronto city council voted in favour of asking upper levels of government to ban the sale of guns and ammunition locally.

Montreal city council also adopted a motion demanding the federal government issue a sweeping ban on handguns and assault rifles across the country.

The federal government is in the process of reviewing how to move forward on a possible ban on handguns and assault-style weapons.

READ MORE: Toronto mayor outlines community investments to curb gun and gang violence

In August, the Ontario government promised to spend $25 million over the next four years to tackle gun violence and gang activity in Toronto.

Tory announced a number of city-run initiatives such as community intervention and prevention measures to fight gun and gang violence, as well as hiring 200 more police officers by the end of the year and in 2019.

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