Advertisement

CBSA told to ‘pick up the pace’ on removing rejected refugee claimants

Click to play video: 'How does Canada’s refugee system work?' How does Canada’s refugee system work?
WATCH ABOVE: Here's how Canada's refugee system works – Aug 23, 2017

OTTAWA – Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale is telling the Canada Border Services Agency to remove more refugee claimants whose requests for asylum in Canada have been rejected.

READ MORE: ‘Illegal’ or ‘irregular’? Debate about asylum-seekers needs to stop, experts warn

The CBSA has set a new target of completing 10,000 removals by the end of the 2018-19 fiscal year in March. This would mean an increase of 35 per cent compared to the last two years.

WATCH: ‘Toy pile of shame’ delivered to Canadian immigration ministers by refugee advocates

Click to play video: '‘Toy pile of shame’ delivered to Canadian immigration ministers by refugee advocates' ‘Toy pile of shame’ delivered to Canadian immigration ministers by refugee advocates
‘Toy pile of shame’ delivered to Canadian immigration ministers by refugee advocates – Jun 20, 2018

Goodale says the CBSA has been given $7.46 million more to ensure that all asylum seekers who have exhausted their legal avenues of appeal are removed from the country.

Story continues below advertisement

He says his department has notified the agency it must “pick up the pace” of these removals.

WATCH: City of Toronto responds to influx of refugee claimants

Click to play video: 'City of Toronto responds to influx of refugee claimants' City of Toronto responds to influx of refugee claimants
City of Toronto responds to influx of refugee claimants – May 24, 2018

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the government has been looking at ways of speeding up these cases to ensure Canada’s immigration system remains an integrated system that functions properly.

READ MORE: After hiding in a church for months, woman to be deported — because Canadian government says she lied about being gay

CBSA prioritizes removals of individuals based on issues of security and whether they have been involved in organized crime or crimes against humanity.

Sponsored content