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Cannabis

Pointe-Claire medical marijuana company ramps up production for recreational pot

WATCH: A West Island cannabis producer is hoping to cash in on the legalization of marijuana. Aurora Cannabis has been producing medicinal marijuana for two years — now they're hoping to take their business to the next level. Global's Phil Carpenter got a tour inside the Pointe-Claire facility.

Outside a nondescript building on Hymus Boulevard in Pointe-Claire, there’s a lot going on these days.

It’s where some of the products for sale at the marijuana Société québécoise du cannabis (SQDC) store are grown.

“It has been in production since November 2017,” Andrea Paine tells Global News.

READ MORE: What to expect at Quebec’s pot stores on Wednesday

She is the national director, government relations for Vancouver-based Aurora Cannabis, and the Pointe-Claire plant is one of 11 production facilities they have in Canada.

Until recently, they produced marijuana only for medical use, but with the legalization of recreational pot, they are also now supplying the recreational market which means they have to produce much more.

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“We won’t distinguish anything between the adult use market and the medical market,” says Paine.

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Their medical clients can order online with a doctor’s prescription but recreational users in Quebec must purchase the product, either in-store or online, from the government-operated pot stores. Aurora officials expect to supply 5,000 kilos annually to the Quebec stores.

“We’re one of six licensed producers that is supplying the SQDC for now,” explains Paine, and she says they’re prepared to increase production if the demand is there.

READ MORE: Licensed medical cannabis producer could be coming to Pointe-Claire

Pointe Claire residents don’t seem concerned that a pot-growing facility has set up in their neighbourhood.

“I don’t think so,” says Barbara Kafadaro who is thrilled with pot legalization because of a friend who uses it medically. “I’m sure there’s been a few basements that have been doing it for a while,” she laughs, “and there’s wine production as well.”

But residents like Ingrid Power are concerned about how ready the province and country are for legalization.

“I’m still formalizing my thoughts but I think the government hasn’t necessarily thought through everything yet and I guess we’ll see what happens.”

The consensus seems to be, “Let’s wait and see.”