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Environment

City wants your opinion about future of Edmonton waste management

The Edmonton Waste Management Centre's construction and demolition area, October 2017.
The Edmonton Waste Management Centre's construction and demolition area, October 2017. Kendra Slugoski, Global News

Edmonton residents are being asked to weigh in on the future of waste management in the city.

The city is asking Edmontonians to provide their input on the issue through in-person sessions and an online survey.

The city said the feedback is needed to help make decisions about Edmonton’s future waste system and determine which recommendations are brought forward for city council approval.

READ MORE: Edmonton looking at whole new garbage collection system 

Some of the topics include options for curbside garbage set-outs, waste reduction and diversion, food waste and reuse, single-use plastics restrictions and zero waste goal or target.

The city said it’s looking for input from residents who live in multi-unit homes, such as apartments and condos, as well as from those who work in commercial businesses, industry, institutions, waste haulers and associations.

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The online survey is open from Oct. 1 to Nov. 10, while the drop-in sessions will be held between Oct. 3 and Nov. 15. Eighteen sessions will be held all over the city during that period.

READ MORE: Edmonton’s long-praised waste management system struggling to divert 50% of residential garbage

Earlier this year, an audit criticized Edmonton’s waste management system and offered recommendations to improve it.

The report from the city auditor found that Edmonton’s compost facility — built with the goal of diverting 90 per cent of residential waste away from the landfill — has been diverting less than 50 per cent.

A rate of around 35 per cent was recorded in 2016, but Doug Jones, a deputy city manager for city operations, said the diversion rates dipped because Edmonton started accepting commercial, industrial and construction waste in 2012.