BC Municipal Election 2018

September 28, 2018 5:06 pm
Updated: October 3, 2018 2:20 pm

North Shore mayoral candidates have their say on transportation, affordability

Ted Chernecki looks at the major issues in the upcoming civic election on the north shore, where none of the three mayors are running for re-election.

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The North Shore is one of Canada’s most expensive places to live, and businesses are finding it a challenge to attract employees.

Transit is also an issue – with a growing population, residents face gridlock traffic on the bridges daily.

With all three of the incumbent North Shore mayors leaving the job – there is change coming in the upcoming municipal election on Oct. 20.

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READ MORE: Live B.C. election results 2018: Find your riding and candidates

Global News asked all mayoral candidates running for election in the City of North Vancouver, the District of North Vancouver and West Vancouver four questions about transportation, affordability, residential growth and any other important issue they think should be addressed.

We are posting the responses below, unedited from the candidates who replied and also identifying the ones who are running but did not respond to our questions before deadline.

City of North Vancouver

Payam Azad 

One of the main issues facing residents of the North Shore is transportation, many face traffic gridlock on a daily basis, how are you going to improve this situation?

  • I intend to resolve the housing problems of the City of North Vancouver (“the City”) to reduce commuting.
  • At least 20 more new modern buses for public transportation under the City ownership (not the wasteful Translink).
  • Extension of Rapid transit to the foot of Lonsdale Ave. Sea buses can be rerouted.
  • A new bridge linking North Vancouver to the other side.
  • Operation of local private shared ride passenger transportation services.
  • Requiring government workers to live close to their workplace.
  • Enrolling students in nearest schools to their homes only.
  • Separation of bicycles and pedestrians routes.

The North Shore is known as one of the most expensive places to live in Canada, making it difficult for businesses to attract employees, what is your plan to make it more affordable on the North Shore?

  • 35% of all homes and buildings which will be built in the City will belong to municipal government (CNV) for public housing and for new rec centers, libraries, addition to City Hall, etc. The remaining 65% will be halved into rentals & for sale units. The City will set the prices and rents for those units.
  • Construction of public housing by volunteers and free construction material.
  • No more than 1 unit for 1 person.
  • Confiscation of empty homes.
  • A ban on foreign ownership on homes and other real estates.
  • A city is for the people who live and work in the city.

How do you balance the demand for residential growth, and the lack of infrastructure?

As stated in answers to questions 1 (transportation) and 2 (housing), above, I intend to:

  • drastically improve public transportation by putting 20 more buses on the road, bringing rapid transit to foot of Lonsdale, building a new bridge between North Vancouver and Vancouver, having local private shared ride services, and taking some other measures,
  • to provide much more space for Rec centers, libraries, addition to City Hall, and also expansion to Lions Gate Hospital and building new schools (out of our share of the developments).

What issue – not covered above – are you hoping to address in your community?

  • Imposing a municipal tax on Banks operating within the City of North Vancouver: Banks have been making huge amount of money, and yet have paid no tax!! This must end!
  • Cleanness, beauty of the City and Health:

(a) Unsightly public structures will be stylishly painted, tiled, or covered by beautiful plants.

(b) There will be more garbage cans on the streets.

(c) Garbage trucks will be required to be washed & disinfected more frequently so those trucks will not stink! It makes a big difference to have a clean and beautiful City.

  • Lions Gate Hospital will be expanded (with joint cooperation between 3 levels of governments)

 

READ MORE: B.C. municipal election digest Sept. 27: This week’s top stories

Linda C Buchanan 

One of the main issues facing residents of the North Shore is transportation, many face traffic gridlock on a daily basis, how are you going to improve this situation?

I am committed to the implementation of the recommendations in the recent Integrated North Shore Transportation Planning Project (INSTPP) report that was released. I will continue to work with and keep pressure on senior levels of government to come to the table with new highway/bridge infrastructure for the NS – we have not been getting our fair share. At the local level, I will continue to support infrastructure i.e./walking/cycling paths to provide alternatives for people to move around. Advocate for feasibility study for a fixed link (Canada Line -Lonsdale Quay) and acceleration of the B Line Bus up Lonsdale/Lynn Valley.

The North Shore is known as one of the most expensive places to live in Canada, making it difficult for businesses to attract employees, what is your plan to make it more affordable on the North Shore?

The City is a leader regionally in looking at innovative solutions to housing affordability. The current crisis demands that leadership continues and I’m committed to that. I will continue to support and prioritize the development of purpose built rental; development of new jobs and housing in town centres and along frequent transit networks; partner with the private sector and non-profit agencies to deliver below market and/or non-market housing within developments; support the lease of City owned lands; supportive housing for seniors and individuals with special needs; leverage senior levels of government funding. Develop a coordinated, aggressive NS Workforce Housing Strategy. 

How do you balance the demand for residential growth, and the lack of infrastructure?

I believe growth needs to be at the right pace, the right place, and the right kind. That’s why I have supported, and will continue to support, growth within the limits of our OCP and where it is planned to go (i.e. Regional Town Centre/on transit routes).  I am proud of the infrastructure I have supported over my years on council that has made our City second to none. This includes transformation of Lower Lonsdale/Shipyards; completion of Green Necklace/Spirit Trail; implementation of B Line along 3rd Street; new sports/arts/cultural amenities, new parks, school district request for new school in City.

What issue – not covered above – are you hoping to address in your community?

To increase engagement with people. To build a truly caring community we need a deeper understanding of the people who live in our City and the circumstances that impact their lives. The stories of their lived experiences need to be told; acknowledged and reflected in the way we design our City. I believe in a greater emphasis on collaboration, compromise and achieving solutions rather than staking out positions. If elected, I will continue to bring that to the table and help to create a context, so together we can have genuinely inclusive discussions of the serious issues that confront us.

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Rod Clark 

One of the main issues facing residents of the North Shore is transportation, many face traffic gridlock on a daily basis, how are you going to improve this situation?

Our current mayor sat silently as the Mayors Council approved $2.8 billion for 6 more SkyTrain stations along Broadway in Vancouver. The province is spending another billion on a new Pattullo bridge. When I’m mayor, not a day will go by without Mayors’ Council, our Premier, our Prime Minister getting the message loud and clear: our bridges must be modernized, and the North Shore must be connected across the Inlet to Metro Vancouver’s SkyTrain network. We need our TransLink Bus Depot reinstated in North Vancouver. Heavy truck traffic should be banned from the Ironworkers Bridge during peak commuting hours.

The North Shore is known as one of the most expensive places to live in Canada, making it difficult for businesses to attract employees, what is your plan to make it more affordable on the North Shore? 

I have fought for affordable rental housing for many years: in October 2017 Council unanimously passed my motion providing for 10 per cent of all units in new rental buildings to be rented at 10 per cent below CMHC market average rents – in perpetuity. Over time, this will provide the City of North Vancouver with a pool of below-market housing for low-income seniors, single parents, and others in need. As mayor, I will lead council to extend the affordable rental housing policy to new strata projects. I have always stood up for renters in the City of North Vancouver.

How do you balance the demand for residential growth, and the lack of infrastructure?

Our population has doubled since the Harry Jerome Centre opened in 1967. As mayor, I will not kick our community’s needs down the road for another generation. The time for nitpicking and second-guessing is over: the new Harry Jerome project is a good deal for the City of North Vancouver. We get one of the finest community centres in Canada. $210 million will be funded by the proceeds of leasing the existing Harry Jerome site – city land – to the developer for 99 years: $210 million that will be funded by the developer – not city ratepayers through taxes.

What issue – not covered above – are you hoping to address in your community? 

Linda Buchanan and Darrell Mussatto can’t say “No” to developers. They’ve given the City of North Vancouver cranes, condos, cars, and not enough parking. Congestion is becoming unbearable. I will put the brakes on the crazy pace of condo construction and get traffic moving again.  The current council approved 3,782 new housing units in the last four years. I have consistently opposed the worst of the projects supported by Mussatto and Linda Buchanan. My track record of recorded votes is available on my web site. As mayor, I will put priority on affordable rental housing projects, family-oriented, and seniors’ housing.

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Guy Heywood 

One of the main issues facing residents of the North Shore is transportation, many face traffic gridlock on a daily basis, and how are you going to improve this situation?

I’ve done a lot of door knocking, and the first issue I hear about on the doorstep is traffic frustration. I can relate! Despite some election rhetoric by other candidates, there is no immediate third crossing or light rail fix.  We need to look for other quick solutions. We should start by cooperating better with the neighbouring District of North Vancouver to coordinate traffic lights, road works, etc.  We also need to find ways to reduce single-occupant car commuters with transit improvements, car sharing, etc. to reserve road space for residents getting around inside in town, like parents getting kids to their soccer games.

The North Shore is known as one of the most expensive places to live in Canada, making it difficult for businesses to attract employees, what is your plan to make it more affordable on the North Shore?

Traffic and affordability are closely linked. The last council voted to tear down affordable housing in exchange for luxury towers, which has driven lower-income City residents away. The City must work with the federal & provincial governments and agencies like BC Housing to keep employees living locally. With recent residential overdevelopment, we risk becoming a high-cost garden suburb. Granting increased density to developers primarily for luxury for-profit rentals must stop. We must drive harder bargains to get fair value for the City and existing residents to improve livability. That includes affordable housing.

How do you balance the demand for residential growth, and the lack of infrastructure?

Residential overdevelopment has outpaced infrastructure and diminished livability.  But it is the majority of the current council—and the developers who bankrolled their campaigns—who have driven that overdevelopment, not demand from City residents. We are lucky to live in a fantastic community. We are going to have to work relentlessly to keep it that way. That includes making sure future development is balanced in terms of mixed uses. We must also absolutely advocate to the senior levels of government to invest in our infrastructure by making the case that our population and economy merit it.

What issue – not covered above – are you hoping to address in your community?

One major issue is the replacement of our aging Harry Jerome Recreation Centre.  I regularly use the facility myself and have long advocated for its replacement.  Our current Council wants to pay for an extravagant replacement by putting up towers in one small neighbourhood, destroying affordable housing and adding to traffic. Instead we should rethink what we really need and can afford, and we must find other governments and partners to share in building and operating costs. At the very least we must at least look at traffic, affordable housing and spreading out the towers, instead of blindly writing a blank cheque to a profit-driven developer.

READ MORE: COMMENTARY: Wave of changes coming in Metro Vancouver municipal politics

Kerry A Morris 

One of the main issues facing residents of the North Shore is transportation, many face traffic gridlock on a daily basis, how are you going to improve this situation?

Our transportation woes are the result of a failure to invest in our infrastructure and the fact we have driven people out of affordable housing and they are now required to commute clogging our transportation arteries.  I will seek to repair the damage through a series of strategic roadway modifications which are all actionable within 12 – 24 months and will have a profound impact on lessening congestion within our community.  I will also support strategic initiatives (at-grade rail between the Seabus and Horseshoe Bay) and longer term investments such as a third crossing and ALRT to the North Shore.

The North Shore is known as one of the most expensive places to live in Canada, making it difficult for businesses to attract employees, what is your plan to make it more affordable on the North Shore?

Each new development has resulted in the destruction of existing affordable housing that has long been home to 52% of our population.  Our new found love of the development community, while ignoring long-term residents, has resulted in many people being forced from their homes and community. I will seek to pass by-laws compelling every developer provide housing options at equal or lesser rents for displaced tenants who become casualties of redevelopment. I’ll pursue a Whistler Housing Authority model designed to stimulate development of social and co-op style housing which will not be subject to market appreciation but simply equity accumulation.

How do you balance the demand for residential growth, and the lack of infrastructure?

We must slow future development applications until we have put in place the infrastructure necessary to support the additional population.  It’s important to remember that North Vancouver City has already approved construction of structures that will result, within 24-48 months, achievement of our 2050 target population.  If we do nothing more to expand our population, we will still be 30 years ahead of our target by 2020, and on that basis alone, the City of North Vancouver has done more than its fair share of contribution to the Lower Mainland’s housing needs.  It’s time for others to step up.

What issue – not covered above – are you hoping to address in your community?

Developer industry influence in our local politics and the day-to-day operations of our local community, has caused many of our residents to lose faith in the impartial adjudication of development decisions throughout all aspects of our community’s administration.  It is a fundamental component of my platform that we shall return to open, honest, accountable and respectful governance of our community. It is my goal that all people will have the opportunity to address council and get answers they seek to the questions they ask.  It is my hope to return our local government to the people.

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Michael A Willcock – did not respond by deadline

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District of North Vancouver

Ash Amlani 

One of the main issues facing residents of the North Shore is transportation, many face traffic gridlock on a daily basis, how are you going to improve this situation?

I support expanding our transportation ecosystem. This includes:

  • Acting on the recommendations of the Integrated North Shore Transportation Planning Partnership (INSTPP)
  • Improving public transit including dedicated lane for B-lines
  • Advocating for rapid transit service across bridges
  • Improving safety for pedestrian and cyclists to schools/amenities
  • Introducing park and ride options by transit hubs
  • Expanding car/bike-sharing, ride-hailing and ride-sharing services

The North Shore is known as one of the most expensive places to live in Canada, making it difficult for businesses to attract employees, what is your plan to make it more affordable on the North Shore?

Improving the diversity of housing options is the first step. People of all ages and incomes should continue to live in, and contribute to, our great community. I support the continued growth of our District through smart development around transit corridors as laid out in the DNV’s Official Community Plan.

We must prioritize the construction of rental homes. We can achieve this by creating a fast-track application process for rental buildings and subsidized housing units.

Additionally, we can further support affordability and smart development by making it possible for homeowners to have secondary suites and coach houses.

How do you balance the demand for residential growth, and the lack of infrastructure?

We must prioritize the construction of new homes close to services, amenities and transit corridors. Doing so will help reduce the frequency and length of necessary car trips.

Additionally, optimizing our existing infrastructure, we can ensure that traffic can flow more smoothly with minimal cost to taxpayers. By analyzing traffic patterns, we can determine where it may be best to make changes to street parking, traffic signals or road design.

New developments must also contribute their fair share towards infrastructure improvements. I will continue the DNV’s support for allocating funds from Development Cost Charges towards improving our transportation ecosystem.

What issue – not covered above – are you hoping to address in your community?

We need to improve how residents engage with our local government. I’ve spoken to thousands of residents across our community who feel like their concerns aren’t being heard.

Public engagement is often cited as the reason for delays in processing applications or making policy decisions. I would create public input processes that reflect the diverse voices of our community and lead to better decision-making in a timely manner.

Erez Barzilay – did not respond by deadline

Mike Little

One of the main issues facing residents of the North Shore is transportation, many face traffic gridlock on a daily basis, how are you going to improve this situation?

The solution starts with effective cooperation between the North Shore Municipalities, the Ironworkers Bridge is situated in the District, but it has clearly become a regional lifeline for the residents and businesses across the North Shore. We need a united effort to sway the Provincial government to fully fund and proceed with all three phases of the bridgehead improvements. Transit is also a necessity not a luxury, but the B Line proposal will not be effective without improvements for getting workers to the North Shore. We need dedicated Express busses from either Nanaimo or Rupert Skytrain stations directly into Phibbs Exchange.

The North Shore is known as one of the most expensive places to live in Canada, making it difficult for businesses to attract employees, what is your plan to make it more affordable on the North Shore?

There is nothing affordable about small luxurious new units in towers. They are marketed at $750/sqft and even the ‘affordable’ ones are only ~10% below market. Affordability comes with age. We need to stop tearing down low cost due to age family sized units and instead focus on maintaining and retaining purpose built rental units like Emery Place which is in the process of demoviction. An occupation survey of Emery showed that it has teachers, a hair dresser, a bylaw officer, a transit driver, an electrician, basically all of the jobs we are trying to protect housing for and instead the council is demolishing their housing for small luxury condos. This is a self-inflicted wound and it has to stop.

How do you balance the demand for residential growth, and the lack of infrastructure?

We are building too much, too fast. We need to slow down, let infrastructure catch up to development and make sure we are actually delivering on the specialized housing ghat we set out to deliver in the Official Community Plan (OCP). I will review the OCP in 2019 and set more modest densities, and more aggressive targets for specialized housing.

What issue – not covered above – are you hoping to address in your community?

I have observed the customer service of our politicians and policies deteriorate over the last several years. The only place to change that culture is from the Mayor’s Office, I will make the District of North Vancouver the most accountable, transparent, and customer service oriented community in BC.

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Dennis Maskell 

One of the main issues facing residents of the North Shore is transportation, many face traffic gridlock on a daily basis, how are you going to improve this situation?

  • Aerial mode SKYTRAIN to Vancouver [Stadium] , much like Surrey has from New Westminster.
  • The North shore has flow through traffic to the Horseshoe Bay #1 HWY aka Ferry system.
  • The North shore has flow through traffic to and from the Sea to Sky Highway 99.
  • The North Shore has thousands of vehicles occupied by people that come here to work Monday to Friday and leave at the end or their work day.
  • The North Shore has thousands of vehicles trying to make their way to West Vancouver or Deep Cove and places between.

The North Shore is known as one of the most expensive places to live in Canada, making it difficult for businesses to attract employees, what is your plan to make it more affordable on the North Shore?

Change single dwelling zoning to multifamily residential [Duplex, Quadplex] allow, single family residential to have up to 3 suites, where it is safe and practicable. New build condominiums should have an effective formula for the number of rental units, not tokenism.  Strongly consider, non-market housing, such as housing cooperatives.

How do you balance the demand for residential growth, and the lack of infrastructure?

This question, goes to planning.  Currently, a DNV City park landmass is to be seriously reduced for a new road, to support “densification”. A main traffic artery has one of its two traffic lanes  hobbled  for a left turn lane to support “densification.” Point – Comprehensive road/traffic planning/ people movement with implementation prior to any densification.

What issue – not covered above – are you hoping to address in your community?

One of the strongest points delivered to the All Candidates meeting from the  staff of the DNV was that elected councilors or the Mayor have no authority to direct any employee.  The DNV et al are immovable on some issues to  a point where court action appears to be the only remedy.  Point- there needs to be a dynamic mechanism where the citizens can review non elected persons for their actions or inactions. It appears a Municipality has the most day to day impact on our lives of any level of government, yet it appears  a City taxpayers has the least input to Municipal Government.

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Glen Webb 

One of the main issues facing residents of the North Shore (NS) is transportation, many face traffic gridlock on a daily basis, how are you going to improve this situation?  

Gridlock will not be solved by an individual mayor or councillor.  A long-term solution requires a collaborative effort involving all three levels of government.

As a starting point:

  • The NS’s municipal governments must continue lobbying the Mayors’ Council on Regional Transportation to provide an express transit option connecting the NS to existing SkyTrain services.
  • Incentives for developers to build family-friendly housing (townhomes and 2-3 bedroom rentals) so that people working on the NS do not need to cross the Iron Workers Memorial Bridge.
  • Support alternative transportation modes for east-west travel across the NS, including express buses and protected bike lanes.

The North Shore is known as one of the most expensive places to live in Canada, making it difficult for businesses to attract employees, what is your plan to make it more affordable on the North Shore?

Housing prices on the NS have made it challenging for employers to retain and recruit skilled workers. Long commute times discourage talented people from accepting positions on the NS, and young middle-income earners can’t find affordable housing that is suitable for starting a family. I support the District’s Official Community Plan (OCP), which identifies the development of sustainable village and town center communities that offer a mix of housing options, including townhomes and 2-3 bedroom purpose built rental apartments. Designed to encourage alternative modes of transportation, these new communities will help businesses retain and recruit the skilled workers they need.

How do you balance the demand for residential growth, and the lack of infrastructure?

With less than 200,000 residents, the NS is in a difficult position when it comes to negotiating infrastructure improvements and transit service with TransLink’s Mayor’s Council. Residents’ desire for better access between the NS and Vancouver will require planning decisions that support the development of more densely populated village and town centers. Containing sprawl by building compact residential developments offering a variety of housing options, combined with reliable transportation alternatives, is critical to protecting quality of life on the NS.

What issue – not covered above – are you hoping to address in your community?

City building is a continuous endeavour, requiring elected officials to be forward thinking, and to make decisions that balance the expectations of residents and the needs of future generations. Regardless how hard elected officials may try to achieve win-win outcomes there will be occasions when difficult  decisions will need to be made that some stakeholders will oppose. The District cannot address affordability and traffic congestion while fostering the ideal of single-family residential development. The desire of residents for greater mobility between the NS and Vancouver will require planning decisions that support the development of more densely populated village and town centers.

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WEST VANCOUVER

Mary-Ann Booth 

One of the main issues facing residents of the North Shore is transportation, many face gridlock on a daily basis, how are you going to improve this situation?

This is complex and there is no quick fix.   For the first time we have a coordinated, multi-agency plan – the Integrated North Shore Transportation Planning Project, and it has my full support.  There are a number of recommendations, but my priorities are:

  • In the short term, continue to work together regionally, implement the B-Line from Dundarave to Phibbs Exchange, and concentrate growth near transit.
  • In the medium term, build a new lower level road over the Capilano River to improve east west traffic flow;
  • For the long-term, begin planning a fixed rail link to downtown.

The North Shore is known as one of the most expensive places to live in Canada, making it difficult for businesses to attract employees, what is your plan to make it more affordable on the North Shore?

I envision a more livable, vibrant and inclusive community.  We must provide a variety of housing that enables young families to live and work in West Vancouver.  Our population is in decline, and we can only reverse this trend by building smaller condo units, rental accommodation, supportive housing, and the “missing middle” such as coach houses, duplexes, row houses and town houses.  Council has just released a proposal for subsidized housing on District land to ensure that our workforce – firefighters, police officers, teachers and nurses – can once again become part of our community.

How do you balance the demand for residential growth, and the lack of infrastructure?

Infrastructure is not the problem in West Vancouver.  We have two new community centres, a wonderful library, outstanding schools, beautiful parks and a thriving Seniors Centre.  The challenge is to ensure that we can properly maintain all our facilities with a tax base that is almost exclusively residential.  Community expectations are very high, and prudent fiscal management is critical to meeting those expectations.

What issue – not covered above – are you hoping to address in your community?

I envision a “complete” community where:

  • all citizens feel a sense of well-being and belonging
  • arts and culture flourish;
  • our natural environment is protected;
  • seniors and young families are supported
  • the charm and vitality of our commercial villages draw many more visitors and residents; and
  • neighbourhood character is respected and preserved.

Nostalgia is not a plan for the future.  It is time to look ahead, to balance the need to protect the way of life that has been built here over many years with the changes that must be made if West Vancouver is to continue to thrive.

Christine Cassidy – did not respond by deadline

Rosa Jafari – did not respond by deadline

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Mark Sager

One of the main issues facing residents of the North Shore is transportation, many face traffic gridlock on a daily basis, how are you going to improve this situation? 

This problem will not be solved without the co-operation of the City and District of North Vancouver, together we need to work for greater funding for public transit from Translink and the senior levels of government. I have the experience needed to deal with these other government bodies. We can also start immediately to look for programs to encourage people working in our community to ride share.  The bulk of the traffic bottle neck comes from the number of people commuting sometimes great distances to work here. Our long-term solution is to find a creative way to house these people in our community.

The North Shore is known as one of the most expensive places to live in Canada, making it difficult for businesses to attract employees, what is your plan to make it more affordable on the North Shore?

As a local business person I am very familiar with this issue. We are currently struggling to find employees for both my business in Horseshoe Bay and in Ambleside. Council has the ability to address this problem in the same way we did in addressing the need for seniors housing in the past. This must be a top priority for the next council, we can encourage co-housing, co-operatives and other alternative forms of housing.

How do you balance the demand for residential growth, and the lack of infrastructure?

Sadly the population of West Vancouver has been diminishing over the past few years and we have plenty of homes in our community, many of which sit vacant. We need to encourage owners who are not living full time in their homes to offer them for rent. Where appropriate coach houses and basement suites in existing building may also offer some of the solution.

What issue – not covered above – are you hoping to address in your community?

West Vancouver is a truly wonderful place to live and sadly, whether as a result of social media or not, there has been too much division. I love working with diverse groups of people and bringing people to mutual agreements. It is time for the council to talk a little less and use a bit more good old fashion common sense. We also need to pay more attention and prioritize the maintenance of our basic infrastructure. The new proposed provincial punitive taxes will make funding needed works even more difficult. As a result, we need to do everything possible to convince the province that the taxes are the wrong idea. Taking fifty million dollars out of our community will not help the housing issue here and only serves to penalize our long term taxpayers.

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Nolan Strong 

One of the main issues facing residents of the North Shore is transportation, many face traffic gridlock on a daily basis, how are you going to improve this situation?

I’m tired of elected officials not directly calling out the elephant in the room which is traffic on the North Shore is a nightmare. Twelve years ago, the NDP government rebuilt a 3 lane Lions Gate Bridge, having 5 lanes converging into one probably the dumbest thing I have ever seen. I’m not running for Premier, but I will start a petition with other mayors to get the province rolling on the issue of expanded bridge capacity on the North Shore. I will fix the grid lock once and for all.

The North Shore is known as one of the most expensive places to live in Canada, making it difficult for businesses to attract employees, what is your plan to make it more affordable on the North Shore?

West Vancouver’s outrages housing prices come from one thing… Off shore buyers. The government failed to do anything about it 8 or so years ago when the problem started to become a real situation for our community so what’s done is done. Now we must play catch up and somehow solve this massive inequity of price for land but still save peoples investment in their homes. I propose an empty house tax for people who don’t even occupy their homes and implement nice low-level condos like Evelyn drive or above the new Earls by Ambleside. Allowing seniors or new families to move into a nice comfortable neighborhood and not have to spend 3 million just to get their foot in the door.

How do you balance the demand for residential growth, and the lack of infrastructure?

West Vancouver is shrinking in population “statistics released by the province are showing more people are leaving West Vancouver than moving into the well-heeled neighbourhood.” (Global News) I still believe we need to upgrade our roads and make Park Royal an easier place to drive threw and also try to move the power lines underground not only to increase people’s views but for safety reasons as well.

What issue – not covered above – are you hoping to address in your community?

TAX RELIEF! I want to cut everyone’s taxes, by first minimizing overpaid municipal work and cutting the fat just like any healthy organization does and with those savings pass it to the citizens. We carry a 26 million dollar surplus, so I don’t know why we are not giving some of that back in lower property taxes.

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