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Angela Kokott: We all need to share Calgary’s pathways

The Elbow River Traverse is approximately 63 meters long, and connects the west bank of the Elbow River at Fort Calgary to the east bank in Inglewood. Global News

I love Calgary’s pathway network and find myself on it year round, either cycling, running or walking. The hundreds of kilometres allow you to explore so many parts of the city. Now that spring has finally arrived, more and more people are coming out of hibernation and hitting the pathways.

That means more cyclists, more pedestrians, more walkers and more chances for encounters of the “not-so-friendly” variety.

WATCH BELOW: Preventing Calgary pathway collisions

Click to play video: 'Preventing Calgary pathway collisions'
Preventing Calgary pathway collisions

READ MORE: In Tweets: Calgary’s river valley gets a spring cleanup

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On our April 20 edition of the Friday Free for All, one listener raised the issue of cyclists not using bells to warn pedestrians or runners when passing.

I’m a cyclist who uses a bell (it’s the law) and I’ve noticed a couple of things. First, many pedestrians are surprised when you ring the bell and aren’t sure what to do. As a cyclist, I just want to give pedestrians a heads up that I’m approaching. If they can stay as far right on the pathway as possible, so much the better.

However, the more concerning observation is that many pedestrians wear ear buds and don’t even hear me approaching.

WATCH BELOW: Calgary now home to largest urban pathway network in North America

Click to play video: 'Calgary now home to largest urban pathway network in North America'
Calgary now home to largest urban pathway network in North America

I believe all pathway users have a responsibility to be aware of their surroundings. Pedestrians and runners: keep to the right side of the path. Cyclists: make sure pedestrians and runners know you’re approaching.

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With spring’s arrival, let’s make sure we all enjoy our paths safely.

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