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Legal battle to ban protesters from Trans Mountain terminal continues Thursday

Click to play video: 'Trans Mountain pipeline battle continues between Alberta and B.C.'
Trans Mountain pipeline battle continues between Alberta and B.C.
WATCH ABOVE: Political commentator Janet Brown joined Global Calgary to talk about the politics surrounding the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline. (Sun, Mar 11) – Mar 11, 2018

A legal battle to grant Trans Mountain a permanent injunction to block protesters from its terminal construction site continues Thursday in B.C. Supreme Court.

Company lawyer Maureen Killoran told a judge on Wednesday that activists have conspired to intensify blockades and disrupt construction projects at the Burnaby Mountain and Westbridge Marine terminals before a mid-March deadline to meet environmental standards.

READ MORE: Trans Mountain hoping to get permanent injunction against protesters in court

The project to build a new terminal will link up with the federally-approved Trans Mountain pipeline expansion to increase the flow of bitumen from Alberta to the B.C. coast.

Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Expansion Project’s Westeridge loading dock is seen in Burnaby, B.C., on Friday, Nov. 25, 2016.
Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Expansion Project’s Westeridge loading dock is seen in Burnaby, B.C., on Friday, Nov. 25, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Trans Mountain, a subsidiary of Kinder Morgan, listed 15 people, along with John Doe, Jane Doe, and “unnamed persons” in a notice of claim asking for an injunction for a project that the federal government approved in November 2016.

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READ MORE: Alberta minister apologizes for calling B.C. government ‘s**theads’

Justice Kenneth Affleck granted the temporary injunction on Friday, saying it would restrict protesters from coming within 50 metres of the facilities where protests began last November.

But Casey Leggett, a lawyer representing one of the defendants, argued a 50-metre buffer zone as part of the interim injunction is too broad because it covers private property and even prohibits residents from using a nearby trail.

The judge suggested Wednesday that not granting an injunction would prevent the company from continuing the work it is legally entitled to do, but he has not yet come to a final decision.

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Thousands of people march together during a protest against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Burnaby, B.C., on Saturday March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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A man carries a sign as thousands of people attend a rally after marching together during a protest against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Burnaby, B.C., on Saturday March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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Men are silhouetted while standing on an elevated walkway during a rally in support of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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Indigenous chiefs and elders lead thousands of people in a march during a protest against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Burnaby, B.C., on Saturday March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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A man holds signs while listening during a rally in support of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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A sign warms of an underground pipeline as people construct a "watch house" near a gate leading to Kinder Morgan's property during a protest against the company's Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Burnaby, B.C., on Saturday March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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Young men listen during a rally in support of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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Thousands of people gather before marching together during a protest against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Burnaby, B.C., on Saturday March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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People hold signs while listening during a rally in support of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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A woman holds a likeness of a wine bottle with the message "Stop Whining" in reference to a recent dispute between B.C. and Alberta regarding B.C. wines, during a rally in support of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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A man holds a sign while listening during a rally in support of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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A man holds a sign while listening during a rally in support of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday March 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

In recent weeks, feuding has ramped up between Alberta and B.C. over the Trans Mountain pipeline twinning, which would triple the amount of oil flowing from the Edmonton area to the port in Burnaby.

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The B.C. government has vowed to do everything possible to stop the project. The Alberta government has promised to cut off gas and oil shipments to British Columbia if the B.C. government stands in the project’s way.

READ MORE: Premier Rachel Notley’s threat to cut off oil to others not a new tactic for Alberta

Alberta crude is selling at a discount because pipeline bottlenecks drive up costs and prevent Alberta from fetching better prices in overseas markets such as Asia.

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