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Japan broadcaster mistakenly issues North Korea missile warning days after Hawaii’s false alarm

Click to play video: 'Japan broadcaster apologizes over false North Korea missile warning' Japan broadcaster apologizes over false North Korea missile warning
WATCH: Japan broadcaster apologizes over false North Korea missile warning – Jan 16, 2018

Japan’s public broadcaster errantly issued a warning of a North Korean missile launch just days after Hawaii caused panic for its citizens by triggering a false emergency alert of an incoming missile.

Japanese broadcaster NHK issued the alert Tuesday evening saying: “It appears North Korea launched a missile.”

“Evacuate inside buildings or underground: government,” the alert read.

READ MORE: Accidental ballistic missile alert warning issued to cell phones, TV and radio in Hawaii

The warning was flashed across the broadcaster’s website and residents with the news station’s mobile app received the alert on their phones. NHK also tweeted the alert, but has since deleted it.

Japan’s public broadcaster NHK’s false alarm about a North Korean missile launch which was received on a smartphone is pictured in Tokyo, Japan January 16, 2018. Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The false alarm came two days after Hawaii’s emergency management department sent a mistaken warning of a North Korean missile attack to mobile phones across the state, triggering panic for nearly 40 minutes.

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WATCH: How did a ballistic missile alert warning accidentally get sent out in Hawaii?
Click to play video: 'How did a ballistic missile alert warning accidentally get sent out in Hawaii?' How did a ballistic missile alert warning accidentally get sent out in Hawaii?
How did a ballistic missile alert warning accidentally get sent out in Hawaii? – Jan 13, 2018

However, the Japanese broadcaster alerted its viewers within five minutes that it had erroneously sent the warning message.

“We’re very sorry,” NHK said on its website, without explaining further.

READ MORE: Trump makes first public comments since Hawaii false missile alarm panic — to slam Michael Wolff

On Saturday, a state-wide emergency alert was activated in Hawaii just after 8 a.m. local time, sending a message to residents that said: “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”

Hawaii officials apologized repeatedly and said the alert was sent when someone hit the wrong button during a shift change. They vowed it would never happen again.

“We made a mistake,” said Hawaii Emergency Management Agency administrator Vern Miyagi.

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WATCH: Hawaii residents, tourists react following accidental incoming missile alert warning
Click to play video: 'Hawaii residents, tourists react following accidental incoming missile alert warning' Hawaii residents, tourists react following accidental incoming missile alert warning
Hawaii residents, tourists react following accidental incoming missile alert warning – Jan 13, 2018

Japan’s government has its own messaging system to alert residents of an incoming threat. The “J-Alert” system sends text messages to mobile phones and triggers sirens to warn of a possible missile strike.

READ MORE: Blaring sirens sound in Japan, Guam readies residents amid North Korea’s missile tests

“Missile launch. Missile launch. North Korea appears to have fired a missile. Take refuge in a solid building or underground,” reads the mobile phone alert.

The satellite instant warning system is generally used by Japan’s meteorological agency to warn of natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions. Japan’s cabinet secretariat uses the system to warn of “ballistic missile attack, aerial intrusion and a landing invasion.”

WATCH: ‘Love you all, but I’m playing golf, the last thing I’m going to do’: Man records message after getting erroneous Hawaii missile alert
Click to play video: '‘Love you all, but I’m playing golf, the last thing I’m going to do’: Man records message after getting erroneous Hawaii missile alert' ‘Love you all, but I’m playing golf, the last thing I’m going to do’: Man records message after getting erroneous Hawaii missile alert
‘Love you all, but I’m playing golf, the last thing I’m going to do’: Man records message after getting erroneous Hawaii missile alert – Jan 14, 2018

Last April, government officials in Tokyo admitted that if a missile launch is detected from North Korea, citizens in the targeted area would only get about a 10-minute warning to flee the impact zone, according to English language newspaper The Japan Times.

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–with a file from Agence France Presse

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