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Niagara Falls’ breathtaking winter views are the upside of this extreme cold

Click to play video 'Extreme cold snap freezes Niagara Falls' Extreme cold snap freezes Niagara Falls
WATCH ABOVE: The cold snap that has descended over Canada has made Niagara Falls the perfect place for a frigid selfie – Jan 1, 2018

It is very, very cold in Ontario right now — so cold that Niagara Falls is basically an icy wonderland.

PHOTOS: Here’s what an extreme cold snap looks like in Canada

Temperatures across the province dropped to record lows last month, as frigid air continues to hover over the region for longer than expected.

Global News meteorologist Ross Hull explained that 2018 has been the coldest Jan. 1 on record in the Niagara Falls area, with temperatures dipping below -26 C.

READ MORE: Winter weather travel advisory issued for parts of the Greater Toronto Area

WATCH: Global News Meteorologist Ross Hull has the latest on the big chill sweeping across Canada
Click to play video 'Frigid start to 2018' Frigid start to 2018
Frigid start to 2018 – Jan 1, 2018

“That is well below average, considering the normal overnight/morning low should be closer to -7 C,” Hull said. “The high temperature on New Year’s Eve was also well below average with a daytime high close to -15 C.”

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WATCH: How to dress for cold weather

Click to play video 'How to dress for cold weather' How to dress for cold weather
How to dress for cold weather – Dec 28, 2017

According to Environment Canada, the typical temperature for December in the region is just below 0 C.

The bone-chilling cold has many people staying indoors, but these gorgeous photos may convince some to venture outdoors to see the upside of winter.

Mist rises above the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ont., on Dec. 29, 2017.
Mist rises above the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ont., on Dec. 29, 2017. Aaron Lynett/CP
A visitor takes a photograph at the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ont. on Dec. 29, 2017.
A visitor takes a photograph at the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ont. on Dec. 29, 2017. Aaron Lynett/CP
Visitors take photographs at the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ont., as cold weather continues through much of the province on Friday.
Visitors take photographs at the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ont., as cold weather continues through much of the province on Friday.

While the photos show ice and snow covering much of the tourist destination, it’s important to note that the actual falls are not frozen.

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More than 3,100 tonnes of water flows down Niagara Falls every second, at a speed of 32 feet per second — which means temperatures would have to be a lot colder than they are now to freeze the falls.

“Historically, ice does form over parts of the falls, but there is always water running beneath that ice,” Hull explains. “This may give the impression that the falls are frozen over but that’s not the case.”

Visitors take photographs at the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ont.
Visitors take photographs at the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ont. Aaron Lynett/CP
Visitors take photographs at the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ont., as cold weather continues through much of the province on Friday, Dec. 29, 2017.
Visitors take photographs at the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ont., as cold weather continues through much of the province on Friday, Dec. 29, 2017. Aaron Lynett/CP
A couple walks near the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ont. on Dec. 29, 2017.
A couple walks near the brink of the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ont. on Dec. 29, 2017. Aaron Lynett/CP
Mist rises around an old barge in the upper Niagara River near the brink of the falls in Niagara Falls, Ont.
Mist rises around an old barge in the upper Niagara River near the brink of the falls in Niagara Falls, Ont. Aaron Lynett/CP

While the bitter cold has its downsides, it does make for pretty photos — and not just at Niagara Falls. Other parts of Canada have also been showing off their snow-covered landscapes.

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B.C.’s Fraser Valley, for example, saw an ice storm Friday night, which left behind some dangerous but beautiful views.