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Edmonton drivers understand road rules but don’t always follow: survey

There was a major traffic jam on Terwillegar Drive following a light snowfall in Edmonton, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015.
There was a major traffic jam on Terwillegar Drive following a light snowfall in Edmonton, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015. Slav Kornik, Global News

A City of Edmonton survey indicates there’s a considerable difference between drivers’ attitudes and behaviours.

The 2016 Edmonton Traffic Safety Culture Survey shows 94 per cent of respondents said drivers using a mobile device is a serious threat to their safety, but 24 per cent said they had done it within the past month.

“Our Attitudes and beliefs can increase or decrease our risk of being in a collision,” Traffic Safety senior research coordinator Laura Thue said.

“Ideally our actions match our beliefs. In other words, if we think texting and driving is dangerous when other people do it, then we won’t drive while we text.”

READ MORE: A pole is struck in Edmonton every day: 2015 traffic collision stats

The city’s study also shows 66 per cent of respondents said it’s not acceptable to speed on residential streets, and 93 per cent see it as a serious threat to their personal safety, but more than 43 per cent said they have done so during the past month.

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When asked if running a red light is acceptable behaviour, 95 per cent of respondents said no, but 24 per cent said they had done it over the past 30 days.

“To reach the Vision Zero Edmonton goal of zero fatalities and serious injuries, we need to ask ourselves if our own actions are putting ourselves and others at risk,” Thue said.

READ MORE: Edmonton injury collisions and fatalities increase in 2015

More than 3,600 people participated in the survey.