Advertisement
Canada

Which province lost the most jobs in July?

WATCH ABOVE: A one-two punch in bad economic news has the Trudeau government on the defensive. Statistics Canada reported the worst monthly full-time job losses in five years, and the country's trade deficit hit a record high. Shirlee Engel explains what's behind the bleak economic outlook and what could lie ahead.

The Canadian labour market lost 31,200 net jobs last month as the country suffered its biggest one-month drop in full-time work in nearly five years, Statistics Canada said Friday.

The agency’s latest labour force survey says the market shed 71,400 full-time positions in July – a number partly offset by an increase of 40,200 in less-desirable, part-time jobs.

READ MORE: Canada loses over 31,000 jobs in July

ALBERTA JOBLESS RATE SURPASSES NOVA SCOTIA

The report says full-time work in Canada hasn’t suffered a one-month blow this big since losing 80,300 positions in October 2011.

Story continues below advertisement

The changes helped push the national unemployment rate in July up to 6.9 per cent, from 6.8 per cent the previous month.

Here is a quick look at the July unemployment numbers (previous month in brackets):

  • Unemployment rate: 6.9 per cent (6.8)
  • Employment rate: 60.9 per cent (61.0)
  • Labour force participation rate: 65.4 per cent (65.5)
  • Number unemployed: 1,344,800 (1,326,300)
  • Number working: 18,023,300 (18,054,500)
  • Youth (15-24 years) unemployment rate: 13.3 per cent (13.0)
  • Men (25 plus) unemployment rate: 6.3 per cent (6.3)
  • Women (25 plus) unemployment rate: 5.4 per cent (5.3)

Ontario suffered the biggest job losses of any province in July, as its labour market decreased by 36,100 net positions. The data said 18,900 of those jobs were full time.

WATCH: How to network your way out of unemployment

Surviving the slump: how to network your way out of unemployment
Surviving the slump: how to network your way out of unemployment

British Columbia added 12,100 net new positions last month, but the province still lost 21,800 full-time jobs.

A look at the jobless rates by province: 

  • Newfoundland and Labrador 12.8 per cent (12.0)
  • Prince Edward Island 9.6 (11.0)
  • Nova Scotia 8.4 (8.2)
  • New Brunswick 9.7 (10.3)
  • Quebec 7.0 (7.0)
  • Ontario 6.4 (6.4)
  • Manitoba 6.2 (6.1)
  • Saskatchewan 6.3 (6.1)
  • Alberta 8.6 (7.9)
  • British Columbia 5.6 (5.9)

Statistics Canada also released seasonally adjusted, three-month moving average unemployment rates for major cities but cautions the figures may fluctuate widely because they are based on small
statistical samples. (Previous month in brackets.)

Story continues below advertisement
  • St. John’s, N.L. 6.7 per cent (6.8)
  • Halifax 5.4 (5.6)
  • Moncton, N.B. 7.7 (7.4)
  • Saint John, N.B. 7.3 (7.9)
  • Saguenay, Que. 7.0 (8.7)
  • Quebec 4.3 (4.1)
  • Sherbrooke, Que. 6.0 (6.6)
  • Trois-Rivieres, Que. 7.1 (7.1)
  • Montreal 7.8 (7.8)
  • Gatineau, Que. 7.5 (7.3)
  • Ottawa 6.3 (6.7)
  • Kingston, Ont. 5.8 (6.4)
  • Peterborough, Ont. 5.8 (4.5)
  • Oshawa, Ont. 6.4 (6.4)
  • Toronto 6.4 (6.7)
  • Hamilton, Ont. 6.1 (6.0)
  • St. Catharines-Niagara, Ont. 7.8 (8.4)
  • Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo, Ont. 5.9 (5.7)
  • Brantford, Ont. 5.5 (6.5)
  • Guelph, Ont. 5.3 (5.5)
  • London, Ont. 7.2 (7.3)
  • Windsor, Ont. 6.2 (6.4)
  • Barrie, Ont. 7.9 (7.5)
  • Sudbury, Ont. 8.1 (8.4)
  • Thunder Bay, Ont. 6.9 (7.3)
  • Winnipeg 6.4 (6.3)
  • Regina 5.5 (5.6)
  • Saskatoon 6.1 (6.6)
  • Calgary 8.6 (8.3)
  • Edmonton 7.7 (7.0)
  • Kelowna, B.C. 7.4 (7.5)
  • Abbotsford, B.C. 6.3 (6.9)
  • Vancouver 5.5 (5.4)
  • Victoria 4.7 (5.3)