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Global BC visits Haida Gwaii

Click to play video: 'Biologists hope eliminating rats will save seabirds in Haida Gwaii' Biologists hope eliminating rats will save seabirds in Haida Gwaii
WATCH: Biologists in Haida Gwaii are trying to save one of the region’s most important birds, ancient murrelets, by wiping out rats. Linda Aylesworth explains – May 20, 2016

As part of our our “Explore BC” series, our News Hour team was in Haida Gwaii this week to tell stories about one of the most remote – but most interesting – parts of British Columbia.

The Haida Watchmen Program was set up in the early 1980s for the protection of Gwaii Haanas, where hundreds of archeological and historical sites have been documented. Linda Aylesworth explained the role the Watchmen play, and how they’re protecting and preserving Haida culture through education.

“I wanted to feel connected to my ancestors, and to my culture, because we believe everything’s connected,” said Fallon Crosby, a Haida Watchman.

Click to play video: 'How the Haida Watchmen Program began' How the Haida Watchmen Program began
How the Haida Watchmen Program began – May 19, 2016

Mark Madryga tried to try the quintessential Haida Gwaii experience: Dungeness crab net fishing at North Beach.

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Click to play video: 'Mark Madryga goes Dungeness crab net fishing' Mark Madryga goes Dungeness crab net fishing
Mark Madryga goes Dungeness crab net fishing – May 19, 2016

And a diversity of experiences is attracting tourists from around the world to Haida Gwaii, bringing in tens of millions of dollars to the region. But as Sophie Lui reports, the benefits aren’t only financial.

Click to play video: 'Haida Gwaii attracts tourists from around the world' Haida Gwaii attracts tourists from around the world
Haida Gwaii attracts tourists from around the world – May 19, 2016


READ MORE: Aboriginal tourism in B.C. aims to balance culture and commerce

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