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Edmonton air quality affected by Fort McMurray wildfire smoke

Fort McMurray smokes moves into Edmonton
WATCH ABOVE: Smoke caused by the Fort McMurray wildfire moved into the Edmonton region Thursday morning, causing a drop in air quality. Mike Sobel provided the during his morning forecast.

UPDATE: Thursday, May 19, 2016: Alberta Health Services lifted the precautionary air quality advisory issued May 12 for the Edmonton Zone. It said air monitoring has shown the area is not being impacted by smoke from the northern Alberta wildfires, however conditions can change. Citizens have been reporting smoke in the air, but the Stony Plain Fire Department believed it was due to atmospheric changes bringing the smoke down from northern Alberta. AHS reinstated the air quality advisory a short time later Thursday evening.

EDMONTON – Smoke from the Fort McMurray fire moved its way to the Edmonton region Thursday, causing an increased air quality advisory for the city.

The air quality advisory climbed to five Thursday morning in Edmonton, which is a moderate risk.

Those with respiratory issues should reduce strenuous activities outdoors if they start to experience symptoms.

There is no need to change outdoor activities for the general population unless you experience symptoms like coughing and throat irritation.

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The Air Quality Health Index went down to Level 3 in Edmonton by 6 p.m. Thursday. However, it may rise to Risk Level 7 overnight, before dropping to 5 (moderate risk) Friday.

Watch below: As smoke from the Fort McMurray widlfire moved into Edmonton, the air quality advisory increased Thursday, creating a danger for some residents.

Edmonton air quality danger increases as Fort McMurray smoke moves in
Edmonton air quality danger increases as Fort McMurray smoke moves in

The risk is expected to drop to three by Thursday evening in the city.

In Fort Saskatchewan, the air quality advisory was at high risk Thursday morning, as it climbed to seven.

Environment Canada recommended people with respiratory issues, as well as children and seniors, should consider reducing outdoor activities or not doing them at all.

People with heart and lung conditions are most affected by air pollution.

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