April 27, 2016 6:33 pm
Updated: April 27, 2016 10:25 pm

Duffy’s expenses could still be examined by Auditor General

WATCH: Senator Mike Duffy was acquitted of all criminal charges in the senate expenses scandal, but his expenses may soon be under the microscope again. Mike Le Couteur has exclusive details on why Duffy may not be off the hook entirely.

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OTTAWA – Senator Mike Duffy isn’t out of the woods yet.

Global News has learned Auditor General Michael Ferguson could be called to examine every single one of Duffy’s expenses from April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2013.

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Last Thursday, Duffy was acquitted of all 31 charges of fraud, breach of trust and bribery.

READ MORE: Following Duffy trial Senate expense rules undergoing quiet overhaul

“I’ve spoken to some senators. Some feel that he has been through enough and let’s just move on,” said Jane Cordy, deputy chair of the Standing Committee on Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration.

“Others are saying let’s have a look at the expenses and let’s see whether or not there is a case for calling the Auditor General in.”

Duffy wasn’t included in the wide-ranging forensic audit of all members of the upper chamber in 2015 because he was being investigated by the RCMP.

Auditor General Michael Ferguson and his team looked through the receipts and expense forms of every member of the upper chamber, except for Duffy, Senator Pamela Wallin and Senator Patrick Brazeau, who were under police investigation for their expenses.

READ MORE: Unpacking the politics: Legacy of the Duffy trial and the trouble with transparency

That audit, which cost taxpayers $23.6 million, identified $991,917 in questionable expenses.

Most of that money has been repaid by the 30 senators flagged by Ferguson.

“Our audit is complete and we will not be undertaking any further audit work for the same period, unless specifically requested by the Senate,” said Auditor General spokesperson Céline Bissonnette in a statement to Global News.

WATCH: Mike Duffy trial

However, that doesn’t mean members of the upper chamber can’t, or won’t, move a motion to have Duffy subjected to the same rigorous process they went through.

Deloitte did audit Duffy’s expenses related to his primary and secondary residences, including per diems.

As a result, the now-famous $90,000 cheque, which Duffy accepted from Stephen Harper‘s former chief of staff, Nigel Wright, was used to refund those expenses.

READ MORE: Duffy’s lawyer worried for Senator’s health post-verdict

Still, during his fraud trial, the Crown argued Duffy racked up $154,000 in bogus expense claims for Senate work.

The charges were not deemed criminal, but it wasn’t decided if expenses like his trip to a Peterborough dog show with his wife in July 2010 was considered legitimate senate business.

“I’ve had phone calls from, or e-mails from a number of senators, but ultimately it’s something that we will have to discuss at our caucuses,” said Cordy.

© 2016 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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