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Do you fit in one of these four Montreal cyclist categories?

Cyclists in Montreal.
Cyclists in Montreal. Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press

MONTREAL – One of the biggest trends that has come out of the “green movement” is the number of people choosing to ride their bikes around town.

It’s faster than walking, and way more environmentally friendly than a car – or even public transport.

According to a group at McGill University, who published the study “What’s your type: A multidimensional cyclist typology” back in 2014, all cyclists can be put in one of four categories.

“While it is hard to define the bicycle-friendliness of a city, Montreal is considered one of the most convenient North American cities to cycle in,” the study states.

“Bicycle mode share for the island of Montreal increased by 33 per cent between 2003 and 2010.”

By 2010, 3.2 per cent of Montrealers used a bicycle as their main mode of transportation.

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The study also touches on infrastructure problems in Montreal, as well as the steep slopes and harsh winters when it comes to deciphering what kind of people cycle in the city.

So, what kind of cyclist are you?

Dedicated cyclist

A cyclist makes his way down a bike path despite frigid temperatures and slippery roadways in Montreal.
A cyclist makes his way down a bike path despite frigid temperatures and slippery roadways in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Rain, hail, shine or even extreme thunderstorm, nothing stops you from getting on your bike.

Your whole identity is about being a cyclist and you ooze confidence when on the road.

You often avoid the busy bike lanes – preferring to ride in car traffic and you’re #sorrynotsorry about it because you’re biking to get to your destination – fast.

According to the study, you “are also defined by not having received parental encouragement to cycle as children” and account for about 24 per cent of the city’s biking population.

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Data from “What’s your type: A multidimensional cyclist typology.”
Data from “What’s your type: A multidimensional cyclist typology.”. Transportation Research at McGill/McGill University

Path-using cyclist

A cyclist rides on a bike path in the Plateau's Mile End borough.
A cyclist rides on a bike path in the Mile End. The Canadian Press Images/Francis Vachon

Similarly to the dedicated cyclist, weather doesn’t usually deter you from grabbing your bike and heading out.

The only difference?

You will think twice before heading out in a snow storm.

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You identify deeply as a cyclist, but bike mostly because it’s cheap, convenient and fun.

You prefer to use the city’s various bicycle routes like de Maisonneuve to avoid cars because it’s much safer than weaving in and out of traffic.

Along with 36 per cent of Montrealers, you “were actively encouraged by your parents to use bicycles both to reach destinations and for sport or recreational activity.”

Data from "What’s your type: A multidimensional cyclist typology."
Data from “What’s your type: A multidimensional cyclist typology.”. Transportation Research at McGill/McGill University

Fairweather utilitarian

A cyclist rides his bike past the Atwater Market in Montreal.
A cyclist rides his bike past the Atwater Market in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

You are a contextual user.

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You won’t cycle in bad weather and you definitely won’t bike if there’s a better way to get where you’re going.

You cycle on bike paths and are part of a group that “is uniquely populated, and largely defined by members who might not consider themselves cyclists.”

You account for about 23 per cent of Montreal’s cycling community, with 21 per cent of that number being students.

Data from “What’s your type: A multidimensional cyclist typology.”
Data from “What’s your type: A multidimensional cyclist typology.”. Transportation Research at McGill/McGill University

Leisure cyclist

A cyclist ride his bike along the Lachine Canal in Montreal.
A cyclist ride his bike along the Lachine Canal in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

You don’t cycle because it’s fast or convenient, but rather because you enjoy it.

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You take your bike out when weather permits and prefer not to ride close to cars; you’ll even go out of your way to take the bike paths because safety is important to you.

This group of cyclists, about 17 per cent of Montrealers, “mostly cycle as a hobby or as a family activity.”

According to the study, leisure cyclists are about six years older than the average rider, have much higher incomes and their main mode of transportation is a car.

Are you an avid cyclist – or do you not fit into one of these categories? Share your stories in the comments below!

rachel.lau@globalnews.ca