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4th grizzly bear struck and killed along Trans-Canada Highway in Yoho National Park

Click to play video: '‘Devastating’ death of rare white grizzly bear, cubs prompts calls for change'
‘Devastating’ death of rare white grizzly bear, cubs prompts calls for change
WATCH ABOVE (June 11): Western Canada is mourning the deaths of a famous white grizzly bear and her two cubs, who were killed in two separate vehicle collisions on the Trans-Canada Highway near Lake Louise, Alta. Heather Yourex-West reports on how conservationists are urging for better measures to protect the rare species – Jun 11, 2024

A fourth grizzly bear has been struck by a vehicle and killed in B.C.’s Yoho National Park.

Parks Canada confirmed Friday morning that an older male grizzly was struck and killed around midnight on Sunday along an unfenced section of the Trans-Canada Highway near Field, B.C.

Parks Canada said it does not have additional information on the animal as it was not previously known to the agency.

This is the fourth grizzly bear killed in Yoho National Park this year, all of which have happened this month.

On June 8, a rare white grizzly named Nakoda was found dead from what Parks Canada believes were internal injuries sustained in a collision in Yoho National Park on the Trans-Canada Highway near the Lake O’Hara turnoff on Thursday, June 6.

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Parks Canada confirmed the bear’s death after investigating a mortality signal from her GPS collar. Parks Canada had been tracking Nakoda, officially Bear 178, for two years.

Click to play video: 'Parks Canada officials remind visitors of bear safety after death of popular white grizzly'
Parks Canada officials remind visitors of bear safety after death of popular white grizzly

Just two days before Nakoda was found death, her two cubs were killed in a separate vehicle incident on the same highway.

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The grizzly deaths devastated both Parks Canada staff and those in the wildlife community.

“An emotional reaction,” wildlife photographer John E Marriott told Global News just days after Nakoda and her cubs were killed. “Photographers, tourists, everybody flocked to get out to see her. I think a lot of people developed a very deep, emotional connection with her. For a lot of people, she was the first grizzly bear they saw.”

In its statement on Friday, Parks Canada said it takes the protection of wildlife very seriously and team members work hard to reduce human-caused wildlife mortality.

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“Visitors are asked to respect posted speed limits and no-stopping zones at all times, as well as stay alert and prepared to encounter wildfire at any time, even when driving along fenced sections of the highway,” Parks Canada said.

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