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‘QAnon Shaman’ files to run for Congress in Arizona

Jacob Chansley, also known as the 'QAnon Shaman,' screams 'Freedom' inside the U.S. Senate chamber after the U.S. Capitol was breached by a mob during a joint session of Congress on Jan. 6, 2021 in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images

Jacob Chansley, the spear-carrying rioter whose horned fur hat, bare chest and face paint made him one of the more recognizable figures in the Jan. 6, 2021, assault on the U.S. Capitol, apparently aspires to be a member of Congress.

Online paperwork shows the 35-year-old Chansley filed a candidate statement of interest Thursday, indicating he wants to run as a Libertarian in next year’s election for Arizona’s 8th Congressional District seat.

U.S. Rep. Debbie Lesko, a 64-year-old Republican representing the district since 2018, announced last month that she won’t seek re-election. Her term officially ends in January 2025.

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Chansley pleaded guilty to a felony charge of obstructing an official proceeding in connection with the Capitol insurrection.

He was sentenced to 41 months in prison in November 2021 and served about 27 months before being transferred to a Phoenix halfway house in March 2023. Chansley grew up in the greater Phoenix area.

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Chansley is among the more than 700 people who have been sentenced in relation to Capitol riot-related federal crimes. Authorities said Chansley was among the first rioters to enter the Capitol building and he acknowledged using a bullhorn to rouse the mob.

Although he previously called himself the “QAnon Shaman,” Chansley has since disavowed the QAnon movement.

He identified himself as Jacob Angeli-Chansley in the candidate statement of interest paperwork filed with the Arizona Secretary of State’s office.

The U.S. Constitution doesn’t prohibit felons from holding federal office. But Arizona law prohibits felons from voting until they have completed their sentence and had their civil rights restored.

Emails sent to Chansley and his attorney seeking comment on his political intentions weren’t immediately returned Sunday.

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