July 19, 2017 7:00 am
Updated: July 19, 2017 9:12 am

Woman gets thousands of messages on LinkedIn after getting rejected from dream job

Jasmine Pak says she has received both job offers and words of encouragement after her rejection post went viral.

Courtesy of Hanna Darroll
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A few weeks ago, Jasmine Pak was rejected from a media program that she had eyes on for years.

Posting her rejection story on LinkedIn, the 21-year-old Irvine, Calif. native, says she didn’t want to rant or complain, but rather share her experience.

“I knew that I wasn’t alone in this process and that thousands of people get rejected from their dream jobs,” she tells Global News.

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In the post, Pak talks about how the rejection had a huge impact on her growth as an individual and professional.

“Since graduating from UC Berkeley a month and a half ago, I have been rejected from countless opportunities that I knew I would excel in. Each rejection came with a stab at my ego, my hope, and my self-worth,” she wrote on the employment social networking site.

“Despite these rejections, I have never let my passion for media take a toll. My passion for accurate minority representation in media has always driven me to be the best I can be. It’s motivated me to work harder than I ever thought imaginable. What more does it take to land these jobs even after pulling out every trick in the resume [and] interview [and] networking handbooks?” she continued.

READ MORE: 5 mistakes you’re making when looking for a job

“Today was not a good day in the job hunting process, but it’s OK. Don’t let the negativity take over this grueling process. Remember where your passions root from. Smile and encourage yourself. After all, you are your biggest supporter.”

LinkedIn CEO responds

The former production intern at NBC Universal wrote her post two weeks ago, and by Tuesday, it had received over 60,0000 likes and over 4,000 comments. One of the most notable comments was from LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner, CNBC reports.

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Weiner thanked her for sharing her message on the site, and encouraging those who may also feel defeated. He also asked what dream job, in particular, she was looking for.

“I am humbled that Jeff Weiner took the time to engage with my post. I didn’t expect my post to reach outside my network, let alone the CEO of LinkedIn,” Pak says.

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She adds she has received thousands of messages from users on the site, as well as some interview offers (however, she has decided to keep the names of the companies private). She has not settled on any offers yet.

Sharing career changes online

And as we live in an age of social media and over sharing, Lee Weisser, senior coach by Careers by Design based in Toronto, says we have to be careful when it comes to careers.

“You want to make sure your brand is squeaky clean,” she tells Global News. “It’s important not to say derogatory things about past employers because it can come back and bite you.”

READ MORE: When is it time to quit your job?

And while people are more likely to share posts about new jobs or opportunities, some also share stories of rejections, getting let go or laid off.

“It is more understanding these days you can be laid off or terminated for no reason based on your performance. There is less shame in this,” she says. “But it looks negative if you are whining or complaining [about it] because you never know how it will be read.”

Instead, talk to individuals on a personal basis about your situation or ask for advice when it comes to looking for jobs one-on-one. And always, remember to update your social media profiles if you do have a change in companies or positions.

arti.patel@globalnews.ca

© 2017 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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