January 11, 2017 12:45 pm
Updated: January 13, 2017 9:39 am

University of Saskatchewan raises tuition by roughly 2.3 per cent

The University of Saskatchewan (U of S) released tuition rates and fees for the next academic year.

File / Global Saskatoon
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The University of Saskatchewan (U of S) announced Wednesday that tuition rates will increase next academic year by an overall weighted average of 2.3 per cent.

The U of S Board of Governors approved increases ranging from zero to five per cent for undergraduate and graduate programs in 2017-18.

“The board considers many factors when setting tuition rates,” board chair Lee Ahenakew said.

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“We understand overall affordability is a significant consideration for our students and their families, and we strive to keep tuition increases manageable, while still ensuring the quality of our programs remains high.”

READ MORE: U of S works to increase percentage of students who study abroad

University officials said, with the increase, the overall tuition rate will be 18.1 per cent below the median rate of comparable programs in Canada.

The average U of S College of Arts and Science student will pay $6,102 for tuition next school year. Almost half of the student population is enrolled in the college.

U of S officials said tuition revenue comprises about a quarter of the university’s operating budget while the remainder comes from sources like the Saskatchewan government.

READ MORE: Saskatchewan’s post-secondary institutions make adjustments for $11.7 million cut

The University of Saskatchewan Students’ Union (USSU) executive said Wednesday that tuition is the greatest barrier to education, but is aware that much of the funding comes from taxpayers.

Accordingly, the USSU executive recommended a reasonable balance in provincial funding and tuition increases as well as giving students some sense of the full cost of degrees.

For more tuition information, visit the U of S online.

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