February 12, 2016 12:37 pm

Canadians are guilty of oversharing on dating sites, survey finds

Looking for love? Try not to overshare this Valentine's Day.

Peter Scholey/Getty Images

If you are looking for love this Valentine’s Day you might be tempted to download Tinder, or sign up for OKCupid. But before you start swiping right and composing an alluring biography, there’s something you should know.

Canadians reportedly have a reputation for oversharing.

According to a Valentine’s Day survey from Intel Security, many Canucks admit to sharing a lot of personal information – and deeply personal pictures – with strangers online, all in the hopes of finding love.

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For example, 22 per cent of Canadian singles surveyed admitted to sharing links to their social media profiles on their online dating profile – despite the fact that sites like Facebook can share a lot of personal data you might not want a stranger to know right away.

READ MORE: Has Tinder turned into nothing more than a game?

But perhaps more interesting was just how open people are to sharing nude photos with complete strangers.

Of Canadian men aged 25 to 34 surveyed, 56 per cent said they have shared, or would share, an intimate photo with someone they matched with on a dating site before they even met in person. Thirty-six per cent of women in the same age bracket were guilty of the same thing.

That number didn’t change much for older men – 42 per cent of men aged 45 to 54 admitted they, too, would share an intimate photo with a stranger. Only 19 per cent of women in the same age bracket agreed, however.

READ MORE: 4 photos to avoid when looking for love online

But scantily clad photos of themselves aren’t the only highly personal things people admitted to sharing.

Ten per cent of millennials aged 25 to 34 admitted they would share the password to their social media or even bank accounts with people they met online.

Despite the number being low, it’s still a fairly alarming statistic considering 42 per cent of Canadians interviewed in the study said they ceased contact with a match after finding out they misrepresented themselves online.

Considering online romance schemes cost Canadians nearly $14 million in 2014, it might be best to stick to handing out compliments instead of personal data this Valentine’s Day.

© 2016 Shaw Media

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