February 10, 2016 6:26 pm
Updated: February 10, 2016 6:28 pm

New Brunswick woman uses dogsled to get her Tim Hortons fix in snowstorm

WATCH ABOVE: During Friday’s vicious snow storm customers at a popular coffee shop in Sussex witnessed just how far some people, and dog owners, will go to get some Timbits. Shelley Steeves reports.

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During last Friday’s winter storm, Allyson Mitton found a novel way to get her Tim Hortons fix.

Mitton, who lives in Sussex, decided to charge through the snow-covered town on a sled pulled by her dogs Braya and Shift.

“It was a nasty day for driving. There was hardly any traffic on the roads, so away we went,” she said.

“It was a stormy, blustery day and we were stuck in the house needing a Tim Hortons treat.”

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Worker Tracy Wills said everyone in the store stopped to take in what was a truly Canadian sight.

“We just thought it was someone dogsledding through the parking lot, but it turns out she came right through the drive-thru,” she said.

Mitton said the reaction to her and the dogs was funny.

READ MORE: 11 things you didn’t know about Tim Hortons

“I hear people saying, ‘I don’t think I have seen anything like this before.’ There were heads all out the window,” she said. “There were a few people in the restaurant and they were all at the window. It was cute.”

Staff served Mitton with water and timbits for her dogs.

The two border collies are not conventional sled dogs, which Mitton said has turned some heads. They have been mushing around Sussex for about two years. although the Tim Hortons trip was a first for them.

“The dogs and I both have a ton of energy, so it’s a great way to get rid of that,” she said.

“It was the perfect opportunity. It was a major snow storm, there was no one walking on the sidewalks, the trails were nice and slick.”

She said she often gives her dogs a boost, which is a great way to burn off the extra calories from the timbits.

“Trails conditions are very important for the lighter dogs. The smaller, lighter dogs require a lot more work from the musher, so I ride a really light kick sled, and I do a lot of kicking and a lot of running in the hard places.”

© 2016 Shaw Media

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