February 1, 2016 11:14 pm
Updated: February 1, 2016 11:25 pm

Michigan undertaking plan to determine if Flint water safe

Dwight "DJ" Earnest, 23, holds his 1-year-old daughter Zariah Cade in his home on the west side of Flint, Mich., on Monday, Feb. 1, 2016.

Jake May/The Flint Journal - MLive.com via AP
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FLINT, Mich. – The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has undertaken a five-part strategy to determine whether Flint’s water, which has become contaminated with lead, is safe to drink.

The state said the plan to try to ensure that drinking water no longer is tainted with lead includes residential water testing, school testing, food service and restaurant provider testing, blood testing and overall testing of Flint’s water distribution system.

Flint switched its water source from Detroit’s water system to the Flint River in 2014 to save money while under state financial management. The river water was not treated properly and lead from pipes leached into Flint homes. The city returned to Detroit’s system in October while it awaits the completion of a separate pipeline to Lake Huron this summer.

WATCH: Flint water: Tests show 45 children have elevated lead levels in blood


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DEQ Interim Director Keith Creagh told the Detroit Free Press he hopes “to be able to say something about the general health of the system come mid-April.”

Creagh said in a release that he met Monday with an official from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and that staff from both agencies discussed how to work together to make the best use of data being collected.

The two sides also discussed the DEQ’s five-part strategy, Creagh said. The agencies have met regularly since early January.

“These conversations with the EPA are a critical part of our shared response to the emergency in Flint,” Creagh said. “We know that moving forward will require all levels of government — along with partners in the business and non-profit communities and the community of Flint — to work together with the sense of urgency this crisis demands.”

READ MORE: Michigan governor signs $28M bill to address Flint water crisis

State officials say water samples from roughly 5,000 homes have been tested, and about 94 per cent have are below the “actionable level” of 15 parts per billion for lead. Still, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder urged all residents to submit a free water test kit, which can be picked up and returned to designated Flint fire stations.

The DEQ said it is working with the state Department of Health and Human Services to make sure residents with high blood-lead levels get their water tested. Those homes are provided additional services in an effort to minimize lead exposure, the state said.

“We want to ensure that all homes are getting the proper immediate attention and the home water tests will help in that process,” Snyder said late Sunday in a statement.

Flint residents coping with lead contamination will be cleared to drink unfiltered water again only when outside experts determine it is safe. Those who are evaluating the water and will help verify its quality include Marc Edwards, a Virginia Tech researcher who helped expose the lead problem and is providing independent guidance to the city and state.

WATCH: Flint residents refusing to pay water bills due to poisonous drinking water

 

Snyder has accepted responsibility for the emergency while also blaming state and federal environmental regulators. Some have resigned, including the DEQ’s former top official, or have been suspended.

In a letter to more than 46,000 state employees Friday, Snyder said “what happened in Flint can never be allowed to happen again anywhere in our state.” He said he wants a culture where workers’ “input is valued.” He also thanked workers for volunteering in Flint in recent weeks.

Ray Holman, legislative liaison for the United Auto Workers Local 6000, the biggest state employee union, called Snyder’s letter a “little disingenuous,” saying workers often are dissuaded from “thinking outside the box” and speaking up, and have been disciplined for not closely following policy.

Meanwhile, music mogul Russell Simmons has joined many well-known entrepreneurs, artists and actors who have visited the city or pledged their support. He went door-to-door Monday delivering cases of water to residents.

The water comes from AQUAhydrate, a bottled water brand partly owned by Sean “Diddy” Combs and Mark Wahlberg that pledged to donate 1 million bottles to the city. The RushCard prepaid debit card system, of which Simmons is a founder, was part of the relief effort.

© 2016 The Canadian Press

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