September 2, 2015 1:11 pm
Updated: September 3, 2015 6:06 am

Ontario ad claims Alberta drivers 3.5 times more likely to be drunk in parking lots

Based on new Statistics Canada numbers, beer is the drink of choice for people in Saskatchewan.

Meaghan Craig / Global News
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EDMONTON — The union representing Liquor Control Board of Ontario is taking aim at Alberta in its battle to not allow the sale of beer at Ontario grocery stores.

The Ontario Public Service Employees Union has released an advertisement claiming “In Alberta, it’s three and a half times more likely that the person you pass coming out of the parking lot is driving drunk” because the province allows grocery chains to sell booze.

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“Do you want to make that kind of trade off in Ontario? A little bit of convenience for a whole lot of pain and suffering,” the ad continues.

The advertisement does not cite any source for its claims.

READ MORE: LCBO union wants province to hold off on putting beer in grocery stores

The Ontario government announced in its 2015 budget it would allow the sale of beer in 150 grocery stores by May 1, 2017, with the number increasing to 450 by 2027.

The union has been fighting to have the plan shelved until there are open and transparent discussions about alcohol policy.

The ad claims expanding the number of outlets that sell alcohol will encourage Ontario residents to drink more.

“The Liberal government’s plan to sell alcohol in hundreds of grocery stores will make booze easier to get than a Double Double and that’s just not right.”

Listen to the OPSEU ad below

In 1993, Alberta became the first province to privatize liquor sales. It remains the only province that allows the fully privatized sale of alcohol.

READ MORE: Where Canadians spend the most on booze

According to Statistics Canada, Canadians spent $8.7 billion on beer in 2013/2014, making it the most popular alcoholic drink in the country.

© 2015 Shaw Media

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