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More heat warnings issued for B.C. regions: Environment Canada 

Click to play video: 'Environment Canada issues heat warnings for many parts of the province' Environment Canada issues heat warnings for many parts of the province
Another heat wave has arrived in B.C., with Environment Canada issuing a heat warning and records are expected to be smashed. Grace Ke tells us what we need to know and how to keep cool. – Aug 17, 2022

More heat warnings have been issued for many regions across British Columbia for Wednesday, Aug. 17.

According to Environment Canada, daytime high temperatures of 29 to 35 C are expected inland in the coastal region with 27 C expected near water.

Read more: 10 heat warnings issued for parts of B.C. with temperatures up to 40 C

The heat is being attributed to a strong ridge of high pressure which will bring a “short lived heat wave to British Columbia,” Environment Canada said.

Click to play video: 'Temperatures rising across much of B.C. until Thursday' Temperatures rising across much of B.C. until Thursday
Temperatures rising across much of B.C. until Thursday – Aug 17, 2022

There are currently 12 regions in B.C. under a heat warning including: Metro Vancouver, Central Coast inland sections, East Vancouver Island, Fraser Canyon, Fraser Valley, Howe Sound, Kootenay Lake, North Coast inland sections, North Thompson, Okanagan Valley, South Thompson and the Sunshine Coast.

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Read more: Heat warnings continue across Canada amid scorching temperatures, humidity

Temperatures up to 40 C are expected for some areas including the Okanagan Valley, Fraser Canyon and South Thompson regions.

“Drink plenty of water even before you feel thirsty and stay in a cool place,” said Environment Canada, in the heat alert.

“Reduce your heat risk. Schedule outdoor activities during the coolest parts of the day.”

Read more: Extreme heat and pets: How to keep your furry friends cool 

Dr. Birinder Narang, a Global BC medical contributor, offered some tips for those at risk of experiencing heat-related illness.

“Things you want to look for are severe nausea and vomiting, fainting or loss of consciousness, confusion or disorientation, difficulty speaking, movement coordination problems, (feeling) lethargic, not sweating or not urinating can also be a sign of severe dehydration,” said Narang.

“Severe heat illnesses and heat stroke are medical emergencies and people should call 9-1-1.”

Click to play video: 'Hot weather safety tips to prevent heat-related illnesses' Hot weather safety tips to prevent heat-related illnesses
Hot weather safety tips to prevent heat-related illnesses – Jun 25, 2021

The City of Vancouver is encouraging residents to use cooling centres amid ongoing heat alerts.

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As daytime highs in Vancouver are expected to reach upwards of 35 C on Wednesday, the City of Vancouver has listed a number of cooling centres people can use to get out of the heat.

Read more: Extreme heat running up your hydro bill? How to save money and keep cool

Some community centres and most public libraries have air-conditioned spaces people can use. There are also a number of misting stations that have been placed around the city.

A list of locations for cooling centres and misting stations can be found on the City of Vancouver website.

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The City of Vancouver is not the only municipality that has cooling centres for the public.

A list of cooling centres around the province has been curated on the B.C. government’s EmergencyInfoBC webpage, as well.

Read more: Summer arrives in Canada, and so does extreme heat. How to stay safe

The heat warnings across the province are expected to last until Thursday.

Online resources for protecting oneself from the heat are available on the HealthLink BC website.

Click to play video: 'B.C. reports 16 heat-related deaths in recent heat wave' B.C. reports 16 heat-related deaths in recent heat wave
B.C. reports 16 heat-related deaths in recent heat wave – Aug 9, 2022

– with files from Global BC’s Elizabeth McSheffrey

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