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N.S. Tories propose bill to prohibit extra fees for small solar power producers

Click to play video: 'N.S. Tories propose bill to prohibit extra fees for small solar power producers' N.S. Tories propose bill to prohibit extra fees for small solar power producers
WATCH: Nova Scotia's Progressive Conservative government tabled legislation that prohibits Nova Scotia Power from charging net metering for solar power users. Critics say it's a good step forward, but worry it won’t do enough to protect ratepayers. – Apr 7, 2022

Nova Scotia’s Progressive Conservative government tabled legislation today aimed at protecting the province’s solar energy sector.

The proposed amendments under the Electricity and Public Utilities Acts mean residents with renewable electricity sources, such as solar panels, won’t have to pay anything to Nova Scotia Power as long as they produce enough electricity.

Read more: Renewable energy customers call for overhaul of legislation that governs Nova Scotia Power

Amendments include a guarantee that ratepayers who are connected to the grid and generate renewable power will not have to pay Nova Scotia Power to “net meter,” which is when they receive a credit for electricity provided back to the grid.

Click to play video: 'N.S. stopping Nova Scotia Power from charging net metering fee for solar users' N.S. stopping Nova Scotia Power from charging net metering fee for solar users
N.S. stopping Nova Scotia Power from charging net metering fee for solar users – Feb 2, 2022

Natural Resources Minister Tory Rushton says the changes will empower residents to “join our fight against climate change.”

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Read more: Nova Scotia government kills utility’s bid to impose ‘net metering’ charge on solar

The amendments come after the government rejected a bid from Nova Scotia Power in February that would have allowed the utility to charge fees to customers who sell renewable power back to the grid.

At the time, Premier Tim Houston called elements of the utility’s application “inappropriate” because they discouraged investment in solar energy.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 7, 2022.

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