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Delta, B.C. police expand use of body-worn cameras

Click to play video: 'Gang activity leads to Delta Police extending body worn cameras pilot project' Gang activity leads to Delta Police extending body worn cameras pilot project
WATCH: The Delta police force extends a pilot project into using body-worn cameras after recent gang activity threatens innocent lives. Delta police Chief Constable Neil Dubord explains why it's important technology to the force. – May 24, 2021

Police in Delta, B.C., are expanding their use of body-worn cameras to include its traffic section.

Starting in November, people who are pulled over for speeding or distracted driving may now have an interaction with an officer wearing a body camera.

Click to play video: 'City of Burnaby looking to equip bylaw officers with body cameras' City of Burnaby looking to equip bylaw officers with body cameras
City of Burnaby looking to equip bylaw officers with body cameras – Jan 9, 2021

The Delta Police Department (DPD) conducted a pilot project in January, which consisted mostly of using the cameras during officer training.

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That pilot was expanded in May, amid a spike in gang-related violence, to their team targeting gang and gang affiliates.

Delta police said Monday that its board has approved eight additional cameras assigned to the traffic section, bringing the total number of cameras in the department to 16.

Read more: Police body cameras in Canada: How common are they and do they reduce excessive force?

In a statement, acting Insp. Brian Hill, who oversees the traffic section, said officers conducting stops while using the cameras will inform the public that the cameras are recording unless circumstances prevent them from doing so.

Delta police said research has indicated body-worn cameras can reduce the use of force by and against police.

Earlier this year, the Toronto Police Service announced that all front-line officers will be deployed with body-worn cameras by the end of October.

In 2019, British Columbia developed standards for the use of body-worn cameras, but the technology has not been widely adopted.

— with files from Simon Little and Ross Lord

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