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Swissair Flight 111 crash 15 years later

Transportation Safety Board senior investigator Don Enns displays metalized Mylar insulation material in front of the partially reconstructed cockpit of Swissair Flight 111 at a news conference in Halifax on Dec. 4, 2000. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan.
Transportation Safety Board senior investigator Don Enns displays metalized Mylar insulation material in front of the partially reconstructed cockpit of Swissair Flight 111 at a news conference in Halifax on Dec. 4, 2000. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan.

HALIFAX – It has been 15 years since Swissair Flight 111 crashed off Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia.

All 229 people on board were killed when the passenger jet plunged into the Atlantic Ocean on September 2nd, 1998.

The flight was bound for Geneva from New York when the pilots reported smoke in the cockpit.

The wide-body jet disappeared from radar and struck St. Margarets Bay nose first at 10:31 p-m, killing everyone instantly.

People who live along Nova Scotia’s rugged south shore rushed to the scene that night, hoping to pull survivors from the sea only to take part in the grim task of recovering remains.

The accident launched what would become one of the costliest and most complicated aviation investigations.

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The Transportation Safety Board later determined that faulty electrical wiring caused a fire aboard the aircraft.

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