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Messages of support pour in for Edmonton ultramarathon runner fighting for her life

Click to play video: 'Edmonton ultramarathon runner fighting for her life after being struck by vehicle' Edmonton ultramarathon runner fighting for her life after being struck by vehicle
WATCH ABOVE: Messages of support are pouring in for Edmonton ultramarathon runner as the 36 year old fights for her life after being struck by a vehicle while out for a run. Kim Smith reports – Jul 8, 2021

A 36-year-old ultramarathon runner from Edmonton is fighting for her life in hospital after she was out for a run in her neighbourhood last Tuesday when she was struck by a vehicle.

“We recently found out that she’s in a coma and fighting,” Rebecca Tetley said Thursday morning, regarding her sister Christine Knicely.

“We found out (last week) that she has a broken skull and jaw, six fractured ribs and a broken shoulder. She’s had surgery to remove a piece of her skull to release the pressure.”

According to police, the 36-year-old was hit at about 9:10 p.m. on June 29 by a Jeep Wrangler driven by a 27-year-old woman near 152 Avenue and 127 Street.

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Read more: Police investigate after pedestrian seriously injured by SUV in north Edmonton

At the time of the collision, investigators said sun glare may have been a contributing factor to the collision. On Thursday, a spokesperson for the EPS said the investigation into the collision was ongoing.

Tetley said Knicely was training for a 100-kilometre race in the mountains this summer and in preparation, she said her sister would run and bike about 150 kilometres per week.

“She’s always working towards a new goal,” Tetley said.

Knicely is described as an adventure seeker, a goal chaser and spontaneous and Tetley said messages of support are pouring in from all over the world.

Christine Knicely, 36, was struck by a vehicle in north Edmonton while out for a run on June 29. Supplied
Christine Knicely, 36, was struck by a vehicle in north Edmonton while out for a run on June 29. Supplied

“She’s helped people get into running and mountain climbing and taken people on their first hike. They say that she’s the strongest person they all know and that she’s going to get through this,” Tetley said.

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Knicely was first admitted to the Royal Alexandra Hospital before being transferred to the University of Alberta Hospital.

Only two visitors are permitted in the hospital, so Tetley and her mom have been by her side nearly all day and night.

“She is the most loving, caring person that anyone could ever meet,” Tetley said about her sister.

“The amount of support that she’s received and the kind things that people have said worldwide is phenomenal.”

A GoFundMe has been set up to help with Knicely’s recovery.

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