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Two charged following hours-long standoff with police in Granum

Police on the scene of a standoff in Granum on Tuesday, March 16. Global News

Two people have been charged following a standoff in southern Alberta hamlet of Granum earlier this week.

Police tried to arrest a man at a home in Granum on Tuesday evening, when he barricaded himself in the house, prompting a standoff with officers that lasted several hours.

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The area around the house was closed off, and people in nearby homes were told to stay inside for their own safety, though police said there was no risk to members of the public.

Lethbridge police said Thursday that two people had been arrested, and stolen property including six vehicles taken from Calgary and Lethbridge had been recovered.

Police said it’s believed the people arrested Tuesday were involved in multiple vehicle thefts and break-ins in southern Alberta.

Police on the scene of a standoff in Granum on Tuesday, March 16. Global News

Nicholas Scout, 36, is facing a slew of charges, including:

  • Three counts of possessing stolen property over $5,000
  • Three counts of possession of stolen property under $5,000
  • Theft under $5,000
  • Six counts of failing to comply with release conditions
  • Driving while disqualified

He is scheduled to appear in court on Friday, March 18.

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Tila Scout, 29, was charged with two counts of possessing stolen property over $5,000, break and enter to commit theft and resisting arrest.

She is scheduled to appear in court on April 12.

Police said because of the weapons, including guns, seized from one of the stolen vehicles, more charges are pending against both Tila and Nicholas. Police said the two “are associated with one other but not related.”

“Lethbridge police would like to thank Blood Tribe Police and RCMP for their assistance in this investigation,” Lethbridge police said.

“The willingness of local law enforcement agencies to work collaboratively allows each to make a greater impact in their own communities, and the larger southern Alberta community as a whole.”

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