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Ghost bike memorial held for Calgary motorcyclist killed in crash

Family and friends gathered on Sunday to place a memorial ghost bike at the scene of the crash that claimed the life of 23-year-old Calgarian Caleb Bryce. Michael King / Global News

More than 100 motorcyclists rode as one on Sunday as part of a memorial for a Calgary man killed in a motorcycle crash.

Police said 23-year-old Caleb Bryce was travelling west on Barlow Trail, approaching the intersection at 26 Street S.E., when a 2011 Subaru Outback, driven by a 41-year-old woman, was turning east onto Barlow Trail from southbound 26 Street S.E.

Police said the Subaru ended up in the path of the motorcycle. The man on the bike applied his brakes but the motorcycle fell onto its left and slid into the Subaru.

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Bryce was pronounced dead at the scene.

Officers believe a vehicle parked on the northeast corner of the intersection and an advertising board prevented drivers of the vehicle and motorcycle from seeing each other.

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Ghost bike

On Sunday, friends and family gathered at the scene of the crash to place a white-painted motorcycle in memory of Bryce.

The bike was provided by Riders YYC, a motorcycle group that Bryce had belonged to.

Trinity Chehade, a co-founder of Riders YYC, said the bike sends a message for all road users to make safety a priority while on Calgary’s roads.

“But our number one [priority] was doing this for Caleb,” said Chehade. “He lived a full life. We didn’t know him for that long but it didn’t take long for us to gather what kind of person he was.”

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Chehade said that while riding was one of Bryce’s favourite things to do, his family was always the focus.

“His number one passion was his wife and his family and his church. We can do nothing but respect that,” said Chehade.

Alan Bryce, Caleb’s father, said the show of support by the motorcycle community was overwhelming.

“You have no idea what it is to see the influence your kids start having in their own communities once they leave,” said Alan.

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“Then you look at [this turnout] and it’s gobsmacking. We thank you from the bottom of our hearts.”

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