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South Shore mom’s contact-free Halloween candy dispenser designed for safe trick or treating

Click to play video 'South Shore mom’s contact-free Halloween candy dispenser designed for safe trick or treating' South Shore mom’s contact-free Halloween candy dispenser designed for safe trick or treating
WATCH: As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise, there’s uncertainty over how Halloween will be marked this year. A South Shore mom has created a contact-free Halloween display for kids to be able to trick or treat. Kwabena Oduro reports.

As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise, there’s uncertainty over how Halloween will be marked this year. A South Shore mom has created a contact-free Halloween display for kids to be able to trick or treat.

“It was important for me to have a Halloween this year because the kids again they live through the COVID situation. They were out of school and didn’t see their friends. This allows them to be with their friends” Audrey Pelletier said.

Pelletier, who lives in Beloeil, installed a PVC pipe on the railing at her house to create a candy slide from her front door to where kids could wait with their treat bags.

“The kids are really attracted to the candies slide and it makes it fun for them. They kind of forget about the COVID situation. It allows me being far from them, not to have a mask and have expressions with them to see their smile and for them to see my smile,” Pelletier told Global News.

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READ MORE: COVID-19: Quebec reports over 400 new cases for 2nd consecutive day

Distributing the candy is not the only thing that Pelletier wanted to make sure was safe for the children. She designed a system to make it easy for kids to understand how to use the dispenser.

“I had an entry and exit sign and tape with arrow signs so kids can see where they have to stand and where someone goes and where they have to stand after that to get the candy,” said Pelletier.

Neighbourhood children appear to be excited for the opportunity to trick or treat this Halloween.

“I’m really happy because I love Halloween and I get candy,” said Olivia Theologitis.

Her sister, Isabella, reminisced about the days when she could ring doorbells and get a bunch of candy.

“It’s nice to know children will be able to have a Halloween this year. Personally, when I was younger I had no trouble trick or treating and it’s fun to know this will be done this year in a safe manner,” Isabella said.

READ MORE: Montreal parents, teachers question protocols as high school deals with COVID-19 outbreak

Pelletier set up a trial run to see how effective and efficient the system could be. At least one parent who showed up to watch said he was amazed.

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“I think it’s an amazing idea especially with the crisis we’re living right now,” Tony Theologitis said. “It shows all the communities in the world that we can still continue our lives and do our activities and be safe.”

As Halloween approaches, Pelletier says she hopes her device inspires other parents to look for safe ways to celebrate trick or treating.

“The children have been out of school all summer, and there wasn’t much for them to do. I wanted to make sure that children could have a Halloween. It’s outdoors and it can be done safely.” Pelletier told Global News.